Education of the Intellectually Gifted

By Milton J. Gold | Go to book overview

Chapter 3
Intelligence and Intelligence Testing

Whatever exists at all exists in some amount. To know it thoroughly involves knowing. its quantity as well as its quality.

-- E. L. Thorndike

Perhaps no measure used in education is more venerated or more profaned by the public than the IQ. On the positive side, this attitude reflects a readiness to accept a range of differences in intellectual ability and the possibility of measuring these differences. On the negative side, an unquestioning, almost idolatrous, attitude toward, the measure reflects popular misunderstanding of the limitations of existing tests of mental ability.

It may be that the measure finds widespread acceptance simply because the need for such a measure is so great. Somehow, ability has to be identified and evaluated if education is to be truly adapted to individual differences. A highly specialized culture is constantly in need of differentiating devices in order to match pegs of infinite diversity with holes that are equally varied. The need for predicting probable achievement cannot be met without identifying (1) the nature of abilities needed, (2) the conditions under which ability culminates in achievement, and (3) individuals who have the necessary native ability or the required developed ability at some specified time prior to the beginning of specialized training.

Into this vacuum of need a host of intelligence tests have rushed since Binet and Simon published the first useful measure in 1905. Buros ( 1961) listed 238 intelligence tests in his bibliography of tests in print

-50-

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Education of the Intellectually Gifted
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • 1 - The Release of Human Potential 1
  • 2 - Characteristics of Gifted Children 25
  • 3 - Intelligence and Intelligence Testing 50
  • 4 - Identification of Exceptional Ability 76
  • 5 - Creativity as an Aspect of Giftedness 101
  • 6 - Planning Programs for Gifted Students 135
  • 7 - Patterns in Education of the Gifted 151
  • 8 - Thinking 184
  • 9 - Language Arts for the Gifted Student 207
  • 10 - Social Studies and Social Education 237
  • 11 - Science and Mathematics for the Gifted 254
  • 12 - The Fine Arts 284
  • 13 - Ability Grouping 299
  • 14 - Acceleration 328
  • 15 - Guidance 352
  • 16 - Motivation and Underachievement 381
  • 17 - Teachers for Gifted Children 412
  • 18 - Research: Endeavors and Opportunities 428
  • Bibliography 446
  • Index 466
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