Education of the Intellectually Gifted

By Milton J. Gold | Go to book overview

Chapter 6
Planning Programs for Gifted Students

The whole art of teaching is only the art of awakening the natural curiosity of young minds for the purpose of satisfying them afterwards.

-- Anatole France

Americans look to the schools for all kinds of miracles in the education and rearing of their children. We have a traditional faith in education as a pathway to success, a panacea for social ills, and an instrument for adjustment of the unfortunate. For the gifted child, schools hold the greatest promise of all since human talents and capacities are not in fullflower at birth. The more sophisticated the gifts, the more they need assiduous development in order to reach fruition. To say that the school owes a special responsibility to the intellectually gifted might imply neglect of the schools' obligation to every child as an individual. It is true, however, that schools are strategically organized to bring intellectual capacities to full bloom and to assist in the development of various special abilities as well.Education of the gifted is one application of the doctrine of adapting programs to individual differences and needs. The Southern Regional Project for Education of the Gifted ( 1962) provides a well-reasoned rationale to justify special education for gifted students. In its manual for program improvement, five underlying assumptions are listed:
Gifted children as a group differ from others in learning ability; they learn faster and remember more, and they tend to think more deeply with and about what they learn.

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Education of the Intellectually Gifted
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • 1 - The Release of Human Potential 1
  • 2 - Characteristics of Gifted Children 25
  • 3 - Intelligence and Intelligence Testing 50
  • 4 - Identification of Exceptional Ability 76
  • 5 - Creativity as an Aspect of Giftedness 101
  • 6 - Planning Programs for Gifted Students 135
  • 7 - Patterns in Education of the Gifted 151
  • 8 - Thinking 184
  • 9 - Language Arts for the Gifted Student 207
  • 10 - Social Studies and Social Education 237
  • 11 - Science and Mathematics for the Gifted 254
  • 12 - The Fine Arts 284
  • 13 - Ability Grouping 299
  • 14 - Acceleration 328
  • 15 - Guidance 352
  • 16 - Motivation and Underachievement 381
  • 17 - Teachers for Gifted Children 412
  • 18 - Research: Endeavors and Opportunities 428
  • Bibliography 446
  • Index 466
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