Education of the Intellectually Gifted

By Milton J. Gold | Go to book overview

Chapter 9
Language Arts for the Gifted Student

Reading maketh a full man, conference a ready man, and writing an exact man.

-- Francis Bacon

The verbal nature of most school programs places primary focus on language development of the gifted. To some extent this focus simply reflects the bookish orientation of formal education. Perhaps more important is the continuing, and probably increasing, significance of verbal and symbolic factors both in scholarly and business endeavors. The growing demand for more formal education in many vocational and professional fields places increasing weight upon more effective language skills for the gifted. This chapter will consider aspects of language arts in elementary and secondary schools including the foreign language program.


Elementary School Programs

READING

Many intellectually gifted children enter the first grade at six years of age already reading. Some are already reading when they enter kindergarten at five. Others who have the capacity for early reading are not

-207-

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Education of the Intellectually Gifted
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • 1 - The Release of Human Potential 1
  • 2 - Characteristics of Gifted Children 25
  • 3 - Intelligence and Intelligence Testing 50
  • 4 - Identification of Exceptional Ability 76
  • 5 - Creativity as an Aspect of Giftedness 101
  • 6 - Planning Programs for Gifted Students 135
  • 7 - Patterns in Education of the Gifted 151
  • 8 - Thinking 184
  • 9 - Language Arts for the Gifted Student 207
  • 10 - Social Studies and Social Education 237
  • 11 - Science and Mathematics for the Gifted 254
  • 12 - The Fine Arts 284
  • 13 - Ability Grouping 299
  • 14 - Acceleration 328
  • 15 - Guidance 352
  • 16 - Motivation and Underachievement 381
  • 17 - Teachers for Gifted Children 412
  • 18 - Research: Endeavors and Opportunities 428
  • Bibliography 446
  • Index 466
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