Education of the Intellectually Gifted

By Milton J. Gold | Go to book overview

Bibliography

References
Abraham Willard. "A Hundred Gifted Children." Understanding the Child. 6:116- 20, October, 1957.
------. Common Sense about Gifted Children. New York, Harper & Row, 1958.
Abramson David A. "The Effectiveness of Grouping for Students of High Ability." Educational Research Bulletin, 38:169-82, October 14, 1959.
Aikin Wilford M. The Story of the Eight-Year Study. New York, Harper & Row, 1942.
Allison Harold. "California Principals Study a Curriculum for the Gifted." Bulletin of National Association of Secondary-Schools Principals, 43:102-106, February, 1959.
Altus Grace T. "Some Correlates of the Davis-Eells Tests." Journal of Consulting Psychology, 20:227-32, June, 1956.
American Association for Gifted Children. The Gifted Child. Edited by Paul Witty. Boston, D. C. Heath, 1951.
American Council of Learned Societies. "Report of the Art Panel." ACLS Newsletter, 9:9:12-15, November, 1958.
Anderson C. Arnold. "The Dilemma of Talent-Centered Programmes: U.S.A." The Gifted Child: 1962 Yearbook of Education. New York, Harcourt, Brace & World, 1962, pp. 445-57.
Anderson Harold H., ed. Creativity and Its Cultivation. New York, Harper & Row, 1959.
Anderson John E. "The Nature of Abilities." In Talent and Education, edited by E. Paul Torrance. Minneapolis, University of Minnesota Press, 1960, pp. 9-31.
Anderson William. "An Attempt through the Use of Experimental Techniques to Determine the Effect of Home Assignments upon Scholastic Success." Journal of Educational Research, 40:141-43, October, 1946.
Applbaum Morris J. "A Survey of Special Provisions for the Education of Academically Superior Students." Bulletin of National Association of Secondary- Schools Principals, 43:26-43, October, 1959.
Arnold John E. "The Generalist versus the Specialist in Research and Development." In The Creative Person. Berkeley, Institute of Personality Assessment and Research, University of California, 1961.
Aschner Mary Jane. "The Analysis of Verbal Interaction in the Classroom." In Theory and Research in Teaching, edited by Arno A. Bellack. New York, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1963, pp. 53-78.
Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Freeing Capacity to Learn. Washington, D.C., The Association, 1960.
------. Perceiving, Behaving, Becoming: a New Focus for Education; 1962 Yearbook. Washington, D.C., The Association, 1962.

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Education of the Intellectually Gifted
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • 1 - The Release of Human Potential 1
  • 2 - Characteristics of Gifted Children 25
  • 3 - Intelligence and Intelligence Testing 50
  • 4 - Identification of Exceptional Ability 76
  • 5 - Creativity as an Aspect of Giftedness 101
  • 6 - Planning Programs for Gifted Students 135
  • 7 - Patterns in Education of the Gifted 151
  • 8 - Thinking 184
  • 9 - Language Arts for the Gifted Student 207
  • 10 - Social Studies and Social Education 237
  • 11 - Science and Mathematics for the Gifted 254
  • 12 - The Fine Arts 284
  • 13 - Ability Grouping 299
  • 14 - Acceleration 328
  • 15 - Guidance 352
  • 16 - Motivation and Underachievement 381
  • 17 - Teachers for Gifted Children 412
  • 18 - Research: Endeavors and Opportunities 428
  • Bibliography 446
  • Index 466
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