Kentucky Politics & Government: Do We Stand United?

By Penny M. Miller | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This research endeavor would never have been accomplished without valuable advice, guidance, and support from a number of sources within and outside of the academic community. I am especially indebted to my colleague and mentor, Malcolm E. Jewell, who encouraged me to tackle this project, and who worked with me on some topics summarized here from our earlier publications: The Kentucky Legislature: Two Decades of Change, ( 1988), Political Parties and Primaries in Kentucky ( 1990), and "Kentucky: Adapting to an Independent Legislature"( 1992). I appreciate the role that the University Press of Kentucky played in our two books, and thus their contribution to the updated and refocused materials used here. I have also made use of the research of and advice from other political scientists and economists at the University of Kentucky--Lee Sigelman, Michael Baer, Merl Hackbart, Bruce Williams, Phillip Roeder, Bill Lyons, Brad Canon, Patricia Pauly, Ellen Riggle, Don Gross, Karen Mingst, Herb Reid, and Ernie Yanarella. My colleagues patiently provided the appropriate mixture of criticism and encouragement. I also benefited from the excellent data collections of the University of Kentucky Survey Research Center and the Center for Business and Economic Research, and from the assistance of three staffers at the Department of Political Science--Sandy Barnett, Holly Durkan, and Betty Pasley.

I thank Temple University for the financial support of research provided by a Faculty Summer Research Grant. I appreciate the early support of my former colleagues at Temple's Department of Political Science and at the Center for the Study of Federalism.

Series editors Dan Elazar and John Kincaid edited my work, and challenged me to clarify my thinking. Jane Curran ably copyedited my work. Diane Blair's Arkansas book served as an invaluable paradigm.

-xiii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Kentucky Politics & Government: Do We Stand United?
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 474

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.