Kentucky Politics & Government: Do We Stand United?

By Penny M. Miller | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TWO
The Political Development of Kentucky

The political history of Kentucky is a battleground for conflicting wider forces and is dominated by its own divisions. Kentucky's "border state" status is more than geographical. Deep divisions were in place before Kentucky's entry into the Union in 1792, and persisted thereafter. These problems were recognized by the drafters of the state seal, which bears the slogan "United We Stand, Divided We Fall." A Kentuckian who moved to Illinois, Abraham Lincoln later recognized in the country at large a characteristic that stayed with his native state--a "house divided against itself." This chapter illustrates some of those divisions and suggests how all of the divisions-- historic, geographic, political, economic, and cultural--have imposed heavy handicaps on Kentucky's progress.1 This theme is particularized in succeeding chapters.

Kentucky was the first American rural land frontier west of the Appalachians, and its frontier period lasted into the 1850s. One of the most extensive mass migrations in western history up to that time flowed into Kentucky. The area was settled largely by bearers of the traditionalistic political culture of Virginia and the Carolinas, who brought with them their elitist orientation toward state government and politics.2 At the same time, a stream of settlers from Pennsylvania, western Maryland, and neighboring states brought their individualistic political culture, focusing on tangible economic benefits, into the cities along the Ohio River.3 German and Scotch-Irish migration was also substantial. It was the fertile, virgin land that attracted settlers, and so they were naturally a part of the agrarian South. The burgeoning industrial North intruded, however, as trade flowed down the Ohio River ( Kentucky's northern border) and then down the Mississippi (which touches Kentucky at the west). This trade was naturally enriched by surplus Ken

-20-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Kentucky Politics & Government: Do We Stand United?
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 474

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.