Theodore Parker: A Biography

By Octavius Frothingham Brooks | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XVI.
THE KANSAS WAR.

THE history of the struggle to people Kansas with true children of New England, so as to secure its admission into the Union as a free State, cannot be told here. Mr. Parker has told it so well, that reference to his discourses is sufficient. There is room now only for a succinct account of his own efforts in this new field. From the nature of the case, his personal activity in the fresh emergency was less than in the cases of fugitive-slave hunting in his own parish. Kansas was very far off; and a press of duties kept him in Boston. But, as far as his influence went, it was at the service of the cause. His counsel was valuable, his encouragement, his generosity in giving, and his aid in collecting money.


From the Journal.

APRIL 2, 1856.

Saw the Kansas party go off, Dr. Charles H. Sanborn at their head, -- about forty, nearly half of them women and children. There were twenty copies of "Sharp's of the People" in their hands, of the new and improved edition, and divers Colt's six-shooters also. As the bell rang for the train to move (at five and a half, Providence Railroad), they were singing, -- -

"When I can read my title clear."

One of the verses would have some meaning: -- -

-435-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Theodore Parker: A Biography
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface iii
  • Contents vii
  • Chapter I - Birthplace and Parentage 1
  • Chapter II - Home and Boyhood 10
  • Chapter III - Teaching and Study 28
  • Chapter IV - Divinity Hall 41
  • Chapter V - The Candidate 67
  • Chapter VI - West Roxbury 88
  • Chapter VII - The Ferment of Thought 125
  • Chapter VIII - The Unitarian Controversy 147
  • Chapter IX - Europe 183
  • Chapter X - The Conflict Renewed 210
  • Chapter XI - The Pastor 241
  • Chapter XII - The Pastor. Specimens of Correspondence 252
  • Chapter XIII - The Preacher 332
  • Chapter XIV - The Reformer 352
  • Chapter XV - The Fight with Slavery 376
  • Chapter XVI - The Kansas War 435
  • Chapter XVII - Failing Health 477
  • Chapter XVIII - The Departure. the Search 508
  • Chapter XIX - The Eternal City 521
  • Chapter XX - Tributes 537
  • Index 583
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 592

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.