The Fertility of American Women

By Wilson H. Grabill; Clyde V. Kiser et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 9 THE FERTILITY OF COHORTS OF NATIVE WHITE WOMEN

A. What is meant by cohort fertility

Attention will be focused in this chapter on the reproductive history of certain groups of women as they live through the childbearing period. These groups will be compared with respect to their lifetime fertility and also with respect to their fertility up to and during younger ages. Two of the measures of fertility which will be used are very similar to two which have been used in preceding chapters, namely, cumulative birth rates up to various ages and distributions of women by the number of children they have borne. Here, however, we shall not be restricted to rates and distributions based on data collected in decennial censuses or in the Census Bureau's Current Population Surveys, which are available only for 1910, 1940, 1950, 1952, and 1954. Instead, we shall consider those derived from annual numbers of births for each year since 1910 and related census data.

The groups of women to be considered are those born in successive years, and will be referred to as birth cohorts. For example, the girls born during the twelve months centering on January 1, 1900, make up the birth cohort of 1900, those born during the twelve months centering on January 1, 1901, make up the birth cohort of 1901, etc. Most of these girl babies grew up and had one or more babies themselves. The consideration of the various relationships between the number of the original girl babies (or their survivors at a given age) and the number of babies they bear is the essence of cohort fertility analysis. For some countries it is possible to classify women by the year in which they marry and to study the fertility of marriage cohorts. For the United States, however, the information needed to measure and analyze fertility year by year is available for birth cohorts but not for marriage cohorts. From the standpoint of collecting data on the number of marriages by age, race, and marital status of bride and on the number of births by duration of marriage, the United States has been a backward country. Since only birth cohorts can be considered in this chapter, the term "birth cohort' will be shortened to "cohort" in most places.

The chief advantage of fertility rates for real cohorts is that they show changes in the number of children actually borne per woman--informa

-305-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Fertility of American Women
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 450

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.