A History of Canada: Volume One: From its Origins to the Royal Regime, 1663 - Vol. 1

By Gustave Lanctot; Josephine Hambleton | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FOURTEEN
EMIGRATION, SEIGNIORIAL GRANTS AND EVANGELIZATION

Governor Montmagny. The coming of settlers. The abuse of the concessions system by the One Hundred Associates. The Jesuits' propaganda in favour of colonization. Character and control of emigration. Foundation of the College of Quebec. Missionaries among the Hurons and Algonquins. The difficulties in the way of bringing the gospel to the heathen. The arrival of the Hospitalières and of the Ursulines. Madame de la Peltrie and Marie de l'Incarnation.

The funeral service for Champlain was scarcely over before Father Le Jeune read "in that hour and in the presence of the people assembled in the church" a letter from the company appointing as Governorad interim the commander at Three Rivers, Antoine Bras-de-fer de Châteaufort. The fact that Le Jeune had been entrusted with such an official announcement is a good indication of the important part that the Superior of the Jesuits was already playing in the country. Very probably the trading-ships leaving Tadoussac the previous September had taken home news either of Champlain's failing health or of his intention to return to France. On January 15, 1636, not knowing of his decease, the company had chosen as his successor Charles Huault de Montmagny, first to bear the title of Governor of Canada, as Champlain was designated only as Richelieu's Lieutenant.

Knight of Malta, fifty-three years of age, as pious as he was brave, the new governor disembarked at Quebec on June 11. He went at once to the church, where the Te Deum was sung, and after that M. de Châteaufort presented the keys of Fort St. Louis to him. That same day he agreed to be the godfather at the christening of an Indian child. Scarcely had he entered upon the duties of his office before he strengthened the battery guarding the

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