A History of Canada: Volume One: From its Origins to the Royal Regime, 1663 - Vol. 1

By Gustave Lanctot; Josephine Hambleton | Go to book overview

CHAPTER NINETEEN
ECONOMIC DIFFICULTIES, ECCLESIASTICAL QUARRELS AND THE IROQUOIS WAR

Governor d'Argenson. The decree of 1659 modifies the duties of the Council. The trade ceded to the Guénet Society. The arrival of Mgr. de Laval. Differences with M. de Queylus. Difficulties between the Bishop and the Governor. Men and women, Hospitalières and teachers recruited for Montreal. Iroquois war flares anew. Invasion threatens. The heroism of Dollard and of his companions at the Long Sault. The country saved from invasion and famine. Godefroy's courage. Le Maître and Vignal, Sulpician priests, slain at Montreal.

On July 11, 1658, Pierre de Voyer, Viscount d'Argenson, the new governor, landed at Quebec. A single man and extremely brave, he was both intelligent and wise. A member of the Company of the Blessed Sacrament and God-fearing, he waited in person on the patients in the Hôtel-Dieu. Since he came into office so soon after Lauzon's departure, the people extended a welcome that came from their hearts and from their hope of "better times." No sooner did the official ceremonies of inauguration draw to a close in Fort St. Louis than the Governor went straight to the churches to pray, and to call on the Ursulines and the Hospitalières. The Jesuits, knowing he had received prejudicial warning against their Order, extended their most flattering hospitality and invited d'Argenson to dine in their garden with the Abbé de Queylus some days later. Then the young people of the colony gave short addresses in the French, Algonquian and Huron tongues before all the people of Quebec.1

On the very day following his landing, the new governor was suddenly brought face to face with his major problem--the indian war. As he was washing his hands before sitting down to the table,

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