A History of Canada: Volume One: From its Origins to the Royal Regime, 1663 - Vol. 1

By Gustave Lanctot; Josephine Hambleton | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TWENTY-ONE
ACADIA UNDER RAZILLY

Acadia and the 1630trade. The One Hundred Associates and La Tour, who secures a royal commission. Razillyappointed Governor. The] Razilly Company undertakes settlement. St. Johnattacked by Forester. The English returnPort Royal. The trade ceded to La Tourand Razilly. The settlement of La Have. Concession by the One Hundred Associatesto Razilly- Launay. The taking of Pentagouët by d'Aulnay. Death of Razilly.

While New France was valiantly building up her strength along the shores of the St. Lawrence, what was happening to her sister- colony of Acadia on the Atlantic coast? For three quarters of a century that country, whose possession was in constant dispute between England and France, was a no-man's-land. French, Basque, English and Dutch fishing-boats came for cod and trafficked for furs. Despite the fact that France had created a monopoly, all captains continued the trade. Foreign ships, one and all, paid no heed to the French law, recognized no authority or constraint upon their liberties, and even fought off the ships of the trading companies. Indeed, in 1627, some Basques captured Captain Daniel, who had been sent to drive them away from these trading-grounds by the One Hundred Associates.1

France held only two small posts in Acadia, while the English held Charlesfort, the former Port Royal. One of the French posts stood at the mouth of Grand-Cibou River on Cape Breton Island, Fort Ste. Anne, under the command of the Sieur Claude de Beauvais. Fifty men constituted the garrison and two Jesuits looked after the mission. This fort dated back to 1621, when Charles Daniel organized its foundation. Fort Loméron, renamed Fort St. Louis, smaller, weaker, stood on a rise above La Tour harbour, to the right of Baccaro Point. There Charles de La Tour was in

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