A History of Canada: Volume One: From its Origins to the Royal Regime, 1663 - Vol. 1

By Gustave Lanctot; Josephine Hambleton | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TWENTY-THREE
THE INTERNAL STRUGGLES AND ENGLISH CONQUEST OF ACADIA AND THE COLONIZATION OF NEWFOUNDLAND

The succession of d'Aulnay. Interference by Le Borgne. La Tour returns to Acadia. Vicissitudes of Madame d'Aulnay. The contradictory commissions issued by the Royal Council. Violent actions of Le Borgne. The La Tour-d'Aulnay marriage. The English take Acadia. La Tour reaches an understanding with Crowne and Temple. The Denys settlements and the French posts. The position of Acadia. Newfoundland in English hands. Fisheries and colonization. The French occupy the south shore. Gargot and Fouquet. The first settlement at Placentia.

When news of d'Aulnay's death reached France, his father, René de Charnizay, a sickly man of seventy-two, was appointed ( November 5) guardian of his children's possessions in France, and Madame d'Aulnay became the guardian of their possessions in Acadia. Four days later Charnizay, as weak of will as of body, accepted a promise of a yearly pension amounting to 5,000 livres from Emmanuel Le Borgne, who had often lent money to d'Aulnay, and in return signed a statement to the effect that d'Aulnay's heirs owed 260,000 livres to Le Borgne. The plot now took an amazing twist. La Tour, learning of his rival's demise, left Quebec on November 1, arriving in France in December. Despite the fact that he was a fugitive from justice, he secured the revocation of all orders issued against him, owing, no doubt, to intervention by the Company of New France which was the sworn enemy of d'Aulnay and was determined to recover ownership of Acadia at any cost. A decree dated February 16, 1651 granted "absolution and dismissal of all charges and suppositions" to the turncoat of St. John. More noteworthy still, nine days later, the

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