From Recovery to Catastrophe: Municipal Stabilization and Political Crisis in Weimar, Germany

By Ben Lieberman | Go to book overview

Chapter 2 STATE EXPANSION AND DEMOCRATIZATION

S urveying Weimar municipal policy raises the task of explaining the causes of the rapid growth of municipal activity in Germany after the end of hyperinflation. Widespread desire for recovery after war and inflation and concern over damage to public health provided clear motives for adopting new state tasks, yet such anxiety did not ensure state expansion. The complaints of housing reformers before the First World War did not, after all, lead to large-scale promotion of new housing construction in the absence of a political consensus in favor of government support for new housing settlements. What, then, were the political causes of the further growth of state activity on the local level during the Weimar Republic?

Since much of the growth of Weimar State activity occurred in social provision, histories of social policy might provide a useful approach for explaining the causes of Weimar State expansion; however, the vast field of inquiry into the history of social policy has yielded no single conclusive explanation of the origins and development of social states.1 In the absence of agreement on any one model for the emergence of social states, analysis has instead sought to categorize major different types of social states.2 Such variation in the causes for the growth of social welfare can also be noted in the history of social policy in an individual country. The German social state, for example, began its growth under very different political conditions from those found in the Weimar Republic or after the Second World War.3

In the case of the Weimar Republic, the influence of rapid democratization merits attention in analysis of the politics of social policy. The conjunction between democratization and the growth of state

____________________
Notes for this section begin on page 79.

-57-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
From Recovery to Catastrophe: Municipal Stabilization and Political Crisis in Weimar, Germany
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 221

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.