Political Corruption: The Ghana Case

By Victor T. Le Vine | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction
The author spent the academic years 1969-70, 1970-71 at the University of Ghana as Head of the Department of Political Science.
B. K. Adama, Ghanaian Minister of State for Parliamentary Affairs, referred at one time to "the reports of 76 Commissions of Enquiry" that "have so far been published." ( Ghana) Parliamentary Debates, Wednesday, 24 June 1970, col. 1164. Whether Adama was thinking of all the Commissions of Inquiry reports published since 1945, or just those published since the 1966 coup, is not clear. As nearly complete a list as I was able to compile is found in Appendix A of this study.
Nkrumah himself was not prone to apologize for his own or other people's behavior. The closest he came to an attempt at self- justification is the book he wrote just after the 1966 coup: Dark Days in Ghana ( New York: International Publishers, 1968). Other works about his regime include Geoffrey Bing, Reap the Whirlwind ( London: MacGibbon and Kee, 1968); Samuel Ikoku, Le Ghana de Kwame Nkrumah ( Paris: François Maspéro, 1971); Bob Fitch and Mary Oppenheimer, "Ghana: End of an Illusion," Monthly Review 18, no. 3 ( July-August 1966); David Apter, Ghana in Transition, 2d ed. ( New Haven: Yale University Press, 1972); W. Scott Thompson, Ghana's Foreign Policy, 1957-1966 ( Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1969); Roger Genoud, Nationalism and Economic Development in Ghana ( New York: Frederick Praeger, 1969); Henry L. Bretton , The Rise and Fall of Kwame Nkrumah ( New York: Frederick Praeger, 1966); and T. Peter Omari, Kwame Nkrumah: The Anatomy of an African Dictatorship ( Accra: Moxon Paperbacks, 1970).
Nathaniel H. Leff, "Economic Development Through Bureaucratic Corruption," American Behavioral Scientist 8, no. 3

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