CHAPTER VIII
HARVARD: 1867-1871

IF my career at Harvard was singularly devoid of either distinction or interest, it at least came at a very memorable period in the life of the college. I went in under the old system and came out under the new. I entered the college, which had remained in essence unchanged from the days of its Puritan founders, the college of the eighteenth century with its "Gratulatios" and odes and elegies in proper Latin verse when a sovereign died or came to the throne, the college with the narrow classical curriculum of its English exemplars, and I came out a graduate of the modern university. Doctor Thomas Hill was president when I entered, then came a year of interregnum, and then President Eliot. I think that I cannot add anything to this bare statement by way of describing the revolution which took place at that time in Harvard, and my class happened to come just at the parting of the ways. We realized that a great change had occurred, but naturally did not grasp its meaning or even dream how fast and far the change thus begun would go. No one, I think, could have imagined the vast growth of the university in every direction under the administration of President Eliot. My class, to take a single illustration, numbered one hundred and fifty-eight at graduation. It was much the largest class which had ever entered the college or graduated from it, and was not surpassed in numbers for some years afterwards. Now a class at Harvard is three

-180-

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Early Memories
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Chapter I Heredity 3
  • Chapter II Earliest Memories: 1850-1860 14
  • Chapter III The "Olympians": 1850-1860 39
  • Chapter IV Boyhood: 1860-1867 59
  • Chapter V Boyhood--My Last School: 1860-1867 81
  • Chapter VI The War: 1860-1865 112
  • Chapter VII Europe: 1866-1867 135
  • Chapter VIII Harvard: 1867-1871 180
  • Chapter IX Retrospect and Contrast 200
  • Chapter X Europe Again: 1871-1872 225
  • Chapter XI Starting in Life: 1873-1880 244
  • Index 353
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