CHAPTER X
EUROPE AGAIN: 1871-1872

I SHALL not give any account of our journey in Europe, for this is not a book of travels, and our wanderings were along much-trodden paths and among familiar places. When my mother went abroad with her father and mother in 1837 they, of course, posted through Europe in their own carriage and followed the well-known lines: France, the Rhine, Switzerland, Italy, and a brief visit to the German capitals, winding up before their return with a journey through England and Scotland. When my mother went again to Europe in 1866, taking my sister and me with her, although railroads in the interval had changed the entire character of travelling, she very naturally wished to revisit the places which had charmed her in girlhood and to renew the memories of that happy time. When, again, four years later, I went independently, I wished that my wife and her sister should see what I had seen before. So we made our way to London after landing at Southampton, saw the usual sights and renewed our friendship with the Russell Sturgises, who, as always, were unwearied in their kindness and hospitality. Mount Felix, alas, was a thing of the past, and they were living in Carlton House Terrace, but they themselves were unchanged, and we had many pleasant hours with them. We saw sights in abundance, but few people, for we were not of an age to crave society where everything about us was so new and strange and interesting

-225-

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Early Memories
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Chapter I Heredity 3
  • Chapter II Earliest Memories: 1850-1860 14
  • Chapter III The "Olympians": 1850-1860 39
  • Chapter IV Boyhood: 1860-1867 59
  • Chapter V Boyhood--My Last School: 1860-1867 81
  • Chapter VI The War: 1860-1865 112
  • Chapter VII Europe: 1866-1867 135
  • Chapter VIII Harvard: 1867-1871 180
  • Chapter IX Retrospect and Contrast 200
  • Chapter X Europe Again: 1871-1872 225
  • Chapter XI Starting in Life: 1873-1880 244
  • Index 353
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