England and the English from An American Point of View

By Price Collier | Go to book overview

VII
IRELAND

TO write of England and the English without a chapter devoted to Ireland, would be to omit a phase of English social and political history which throws much light upon the English character. There have been many things said and written about Ireland, sad, pathetic, insulting, vituperative, in praise and in blame. Not being either English or Irish, the present writer deals with the tangled and perplexed subject, not from choice, but from necessity.

The English-Irish divorce case has been in the courts now for some seven hundred and fifty years, and is apparently no nearer a settlement to-day than at any date during those centuries. A vivacious, emotional, law-ignoring Celtic lady is united, not altogether of her own free will, to a rather dull, self-centred, law-worshipping Saxon, and their domestic troubles have been unceasing ever since. They have murdered their children; they have stolen one another's household effects; they have made love, and been

-274-

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England and the English from An American Point of View
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • I - First Impressions 1
  • II - Who Are the English? 37
  • III - The Land of Compromise 78
  • IV - English Home Life 133
  • V - Are the English Dull? 176
  • VI - Sport 230
  • VII - Ireland 274
  • VIII - An English Country Town 314
  • IX - Society 366
  • X - Conclusion 412
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