Analytical Cytology: Methods for Studying Cellular Form and Function

By Robert C. Mellors | Go to book overview

Summary
The theory and techniques of radioautography have been described, the latter in detailed. The recorded applications of the method have been summarized. It is believed that the technique is an important one in the field of biology because of the necessity of knowing whether individual cells or cell units preferentially concentrated radioactive substances in contrast to the uniform distribution in an organ presumed when organ or animal radioactivity is counted by Geiger-Müller techniques. The method focuses attention upon the metabolism of individual cell types or units. Furthermore, the intracellular localization of some radioactive substances id possible, and in favorable circumstances one obtains intranuclear and intracytoplasmic differentiation. It is conceivable that with some of the larger chromosomes it may eventually be possible, with tritium-labeled compounds and the development of finer-grained, more sensitive emulsions, to observe intrachromosomal concentrations (25, 40, 64, 89).
References
1. Abercrombie M., and Causey G., "Identification of transplanted tissues in chick embryos by marking with phosphorus32", Nature, 166: 229-230 ( 1950).
2. Adams A. M., and Miller J. J., "Detection of radiophosphorus in cells and spores of fungi by radioautography", Nature, 170: 239 ( 1952).
3. Amprino R., "Further experiments on the fixation in vitro of radio calcium to sections of bone", Experientia, 8: 380-382 ( 1952).
4. Arnold J. S., "A method for embedding undecalcified bone for histological sectioning, and its application to radioautography", Science, 114: 178-180 ( 1951).
5. Axelrod D. J., "Improved method for cutting undecalcified bone sections and its application to radioautography", Anat. Record, 98: 19- 24 ( 1947).
6. Belanger L. F., "A method for routine detection of radio-phosphates and other radioactive compounds in tissues. The inverted autograph", Anat. Record, 107: 149-159 ( 1950).
7. Belanger L. F., "Improvements to the melted emulsions technique of autoradiography", Nature, 170: 626 ( 1952).
8. Belanger L. F., and Leblond C. P., "A method for locating radioactive elements in tissues by covering histological sections with photographic emulsion", Endocrinology, 39: 8-13 ( 1946).
9. Blank H., McCarthy P. L., and Delamater E. D., "A non-vacuum freezing-dehydrating technic for histology, autoradiography and microbial cytology", Stain Technol., 26: 193-197 ( 1951).
10. Blundell M., and Rotblat J., "Use of liquid nuclear research emulsion in track autoradiography", Nature, 167: 645-646 ( 1951).
11. Boars F. A., "Sulfhydryl detection by histo-chemography", J. Cellular Comp. Physiol., 38: 377-387 ( 1951).
12. Boyd G. A., and Board F. A., "A preliminary report on histochemography", Science, 110: 586-588 ( 1949).

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