Representation in Crisis: The Constitution, Interest Groups, and Political Parties

By David K. Ryden | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

That I was able to see this project through to completion is a testament to the intellectual and moral support, encouragement and assistance I received from countless sources. First, I owe a chief debt of gratitude to two people who were instrumental in shepherding me through the perils of the dissertation process, from which this book grew; to Dr. John Kenneth White for advice and counsel that was always as practical and pragmatic as it was enlightening and insightful, and to my "chief kibitzer," Dr. Ralph Morris Goldman, who deserves the primary credit for enabling me to uncover the intrigue and value of this subject, and whose unflagging sense of humor and energy were unsurpassed and a constant motivation. Thanks are due to Dr. Steve Schneck, the third member of my dissertation committee, for his always thoughtful comments and insights, especially with respect to the foundational chapters where such comments were most needed. A collective thank you is likewise in order for the other members of the Department of Politics at The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. for their frequent words of advice and suggestions, even though they were under no compulsion to do so. I owe a special debt to departmental Chair Dr. David Walsh, who was always intent on facilitating completion of the project rather than creating obstacles to it, and to Dr. Dennis Coyle, who was kind enough to allow me the use of his office and computer equipment while on sabbatical. Helen Foggo, Audrey Whittaker, and other staff at Catholic University are deserving of my appreciation for good-naturedly tolerating my often nettlesome presence and for providing assistance even in the most mundane of tasks. My circle of graduate student colleagues, though they shall remain nameless to safeguard their reputations, provided an invaluable sounding board for ideas and, perhaps more importantly, arranged frequent stress-release activities which are absolutely essential for the completion of a task of this magnitude. Perhaps more important were the members of my WCF covenant group,

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Representation in Crisis: The Constitution, Interest Groups, and Political Parties
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 310

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.