The Art and Architecture of Ancient Egypt

By W. Stevenson Smith | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 14
THE HEIGHT OF THE EIGHTEENTH DYNASTY: AMENHOTEP II - AMENHOTEP III 1450-1372 B.C.

THE episode with the hyena in the tomb of Amenemheb (No. 85) (Plate 107A) shows a carelessness of execution which is immediately apparent when compared to Intef's paintings (Plates 103B and 104A). This sketchy treatment was to appear more and more in the tombs of the period between the end of the reign of Tuthmosis III and that of Tuthmosis IV. The painters were developing an impressionistic use of brushwork which is seen at its best in the fish being harpooned by Horemheb in Tomb 78 (Plate 108A) and the birds on the clump of papyrus behind his light craft.1 Side by side with this looser technique, the old orderly tradition of carefully drawn detail was to be continued, but combined with an ever-increasing interest in richer texture. Not only were more colours used in different combinations, but they are affected by the breaking up of the surface with fine strokes of the brush to suggest such things as fur and feathers. Thus the newly developed technique of brushwork could be used broadly with wide, swift strokes, as on Plates 108A and 122B, or meticulously applied with a multitude of fine lines and stippling (Plates 107B and 129B). We have seen the Egyptian attempting this before, in both the Old and Middle Kingdoms, but he was now learning more about how colour could be manipulated with the brush. Working independently of the carved outlines and modelling of relief sculpture, the painter still placed his chief reliance upon line and was, in fact, making significant new use of curving lines. But there is occasionally a remarkable effort to suggest a tenuous substance, such as the flames and smoke of the furnace in the craftwork scene in the late Eighteenth Dynasty tomb No. 181.2 A rare Ramesside example seems to carry such an experiment even farther. Pale streamers of blue apparently attempt to imitate the shimmering space through which the winged figure moves (Plate 166B).

Certainly there was a fairly frequent use of a kind of shading with pigments, as on the darkened ends of the wing-tips and grey upper surface of the body of the ostrich (Plate 108B). In other cases there is no darkening, but only the use of a more intense hue which produces deeper accents on the same ground colour. This frequently is very successful in suggesting texture (Plate 129A),3 and in the stippling of the bodies of the birds on a ceiling from the Palace of Amenhotep III (Plate 121B) produces something of a feeling of a rounded form. We shall see that in Ramesside times there was an occasional attempt to indicate form in this fashion (Plate 159B). These exploratory beginnings were never consistently developed, but they are unique in early painting, and should be remembered as anticipating a line of investigation to be carried out logically by the Greeks in much later times.4

-145-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Art and Architecture of Ancient Egypt
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 301

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.