The Art and Architecture of Ancient Egypt

By W. Stevenson Smith | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 15
THE PALACE OF AMENHOTEP III AND NEW KINGDOM DOMESTIC ARCHITECTURE

WE have seen that it was impossible to gain a clear idea of the domestic architecture of the Old Kingdom from the few preserved ground-plans of buildings, which were generally concerned with the administration of the cemeteries, and from the highly schernatized pictures on the walls of tombs. The material was more abundant for the Middle Kingdom, with the very instructive town-site of Kahun, which served the Pyramid of Sesostris II at Lahun in Dynasty XII, supplemented by the as yet insufficiently studied material from the cataract forts. Models of buildings are very helpful, as is the fact that the Middle Kingdom artist began to make a more varied use of architectural details to accompany the groups of figures in his wall-scenes. This gradual expansion of scenic accessories gathered momentum in the New Kingdom, when we find remarkable attempts to portray architecture and its physical setting. However difficult this may be for the modern mind to understand, as in the case of the many representations of the royal palace and temples at Tell el Amarna which have proved so puzzling when compared feature by feature with the actual excavated remains of these buildings, nonetheless it is an immense stride forward in the recording attempts of an extraordinarily observant people and provides us with an incomparably richer picture of the way in which they lived.

For the first time in Dynasty XVIII we can examine the actual structures in which the royal family lived. At Thebes we can look into the handsomely decorated bed-chamber of Amenhotep III, or see how at Amarna in Middle Egypt the official residence of Akhenaten was laid out in relation to a city. At the little known site of Deir el Ballas, on the edge of the western desert, across the river from the important town of Coptos, some 30 miles north of Thebes and hardly 10 miles from Denderah, there were two palaces of a type otherwise unknown (Figures 51 and 52). Both have preserved the foundations for a high central structure, accompanied by columned courts on a lower level. The effect produced is that of a tower or keep. The Northern Palace lies on a low mound inside a rectangular walled enclosure about 500 feet wide and probably twice that long. The southern building occupies an area 327 feet by 144 feet on the top of a high projection of the desert hills. No enclosure wall was found, but the sturdy foundations give even more the impression of a fortified building. A well-preserved staircase (Plate 120A) leading to the upper level has no exact parallel in Egypt, although it is reminiscent of the stairs giving access to the higher level of the chief building in the Middle Kingdom town of Kahun and the stairway in the Kerma fort. In the area between the two Ballas palaces, which are about half a mile apart, lay a small village with winding streets and a number of outlying groups of houses, one of which was immediately west of the North Palace. These outlying houses were evidently of the New Kingdom, but the village was earlier,

-156-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Art and Architecture of Ancient Egypt
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 301

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.