The Art and Architecture of Ancient Egypt

By W. Stevenson Smith | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 18
THE POST-AMARNA PERIOD 1350-1314 B.C.

SOME of the most accomplished works of the Amarna period were produced in that time of transition after Akhenaten's death when first the young Semenkhkara and then the boy Tut-ankh-amon, under the tutelage of Ay, attempted to come to terms with the opposition to the cult of the Aten and allowed the priesthood of Amon to be reestablished at Thebes. Many objects from the tomb of Tut-ankh-amon are important documents of the first tentative steps of the restoration, while the tomb equipment as a whole illustrates to an unparalleled degree the luxurious appointments of the royal household in the second half of the Eighteenth Dynasty. The statues of Tut-ankh-amon, like the gold mask from his mummy (Plate 137), continue a softened version of the facial type of Akhenaten. This appears strikingly in the profile of the king's head in the Turin statuette usurped by Horemheb (Plate 139). It is significant of the change which is taking place that Tut-ankh-amon stands beside a seated figure of the god Amon (Plate 138 ). The large grey granite statue of Horemheb in the pose of a scribe (Plate 140) is related stylistically to those of Amenhotep son of Hapu, but it clearly illustrates how the traditions of the reign of Amenhotep III have been modified by the experiments which came in between. The earlier statues seem more severe by contrast, although Horemheb has the same plump, well-fed body and wears a long wig similar to that of the aged wise man (Plate 114B). The erect position of the body has now relaxed into easy curves, the delicate contours of the face have acquired a contemplative expression, and the sleeves of the thin pleated garment flare out decoratively. This is indeed a strange way in which to represent the strong man who was supporting the throne in Memphis during the brief reigns of Tut-ankh-amon and Ay and was soon to become pharaoh. It is no wonder that the sculptors of Ramesside times returned to the more virile forms of earlier times, although traces of the Amarna facial type lingered on in some of the royal statues as late as the reign of Ramesses III.

Horemheb was Commander-in-Chief of the army when he had this statue set up in the Temple of Ptah at Memphis, as Amenhotep son of Hapu had placed the figures of himself in an outer part of the Karnak Temple. Like Amenhotep he had been Scribe of Recruits, and it is as a Royal Scribe and not a military man that he was portrayed by one of the finest sculptors of the end of the dynasty. He was equally fortunate in his choice of the craftsmen who decorated the tomb which he erected at Saqqara, probably in the reign of Tut-ankh-amon. The work is in both raised and sunk relief and of exceptional quality, employing the fine limestone quarried in the neighbourhood of Tura on the east bank of the river across from Memphis. The blocks from the tomb are far from complete and are scattered in various museums, but it is clear that much space was devoted to Horemheb's concern with foreign affairs.1 Some control seems to have been

-207-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Art and Architecture of Ancient Egypt
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 301

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.