The Republicans and Federalists in Pennsylvania, 1790-1801: A Study in National Stimulus and Local Response

By Harry Marlin Tinkcom | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XI
PARTY GROWTH IN THE PENNSYLVANIA HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, 1795-1798

IN EXAMINING partisan trends in the legislature, special emphasis will be placed on the House of Representatives because the whole membership was subject to annual change. The votes herein listed as indicative of group formations and opinion alignments have not been selected from a wide variety for the simple reason that clear party divisions were few in number. Indeed, those presented are the only ones which show real signs of cohesiveness. The striking aspect of these groupings is that they occur rarely on questions of local interest. With few exceptions the issues which produced sharp divisions were of national or international significance.


1795-1796

As already indicated, Jay's Treaty was one of the most effective crystallizing agents to appear in the evolution of Pennsylvania's political formations. The State's reaction at the polls was somewhat inconclusive, but the response made to it by the legislators, both local and national, is more adaptable to concrete analysis. The national House of Representatives, to advert momentarily to that body for purposes of comparison, had no opportunity to vote on the acceptance or rejection of the controversial document. But it did put its opinions on record, if somewhat indirectly, when it passed a resolution on March 24, 1796, requesting Washington to provide the House with papers relating to the treaty. The Pennsylvania members favored the resolution by eight to four.1 Although such action could hardly be interpreted as a blanket vote of disapproval, it did indicate that the Treaty was considered so questionable that it should be brought under review in the House.

The lower house of the Pennsylvania legislature also had an opportunity to express itself on the Treaty. In February, 1796, it received four proposed amendments to the United States Constitution which had been voted by the Virginia legislature in December of the preceding year. The Virginia Resolutions requested the following constitutional changes: all treaties would be submitted to the House of Representatives before ratification, and all those involving the Con

-199-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Republicans and Federalists in Pennsylvania, 1790-1801: A Study in National Stimulus and Local Response
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 354

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.