Trade and Payments in Western Europe: A Study in Economic Cooperation, 1947-51

By William Diebold Jr. | Go to book overview

PREFACE

MY DEBTS in writing this book are many and great. I cannot hope to acknowledge them all, but a few call for special mention.

This book has its origin in some questions I asked in Holland, France, Italy and the United Kingdom in the fall of 1947 to find out if the optimistic language about economic cooperation in the report of the Committee of European Economic Cooperation rested on concrete plans and firm intentions. After the Marshall Plan got under way, I followed the cooperative measures actually undertaken in Western Europe with the aim of summarizing them for an American public in a pamphlet. The job snowballed, and apart from working drafts the first substantial piece of writing based on this study was a memorandum for the Council's Study Group on Aid to Europe under the chairmanship of General Eisenhower. The Group's discussion was of great value to me and I am particularly indebted to Stacy May, Jacob Viner and John Williams. In revised form the memorandum appeared as a chapter in The Economics of Freedom by Howard S. Ellis ( Council on Foreign Relations, 1950) to whom I am grateful for much advice and help. Other members of the staff of the Aid to Europe Group, especially Emile Despres and Ragnar Nurkse, helped me with comments and suggestions.

In 1950 the Council sent me to London and Paris for six weeks to discuss my tentative conclusions with people engaged in the practice of international economic cooperation. Deferring to the tradition of anonymity in the civil service, I will thank without naming the many officials of the British and French governments, the members of several national delegations to the Organization for European Economic Co

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Trade and Payments in Western Europe: A Study in Economic Cooperation, 1947-51
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 494

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.