First Find Your Child a Good Mother: The Construction of Self in Two African Communities

By Paul Riesman | Go to book overview

3
ECONOMY

Life in the Jelgoji is and always has been hard. There is a single rainy season that permits crops, trees, and grasses to grow and sustain animals and people, but the amount and location of rainfall in the area is totally unpredictable; even in years when the overall rainfall is adequate, many micro-regions can fail to get enough, and people can lose most or all of their crop. Droughts are fairly frequent. In recent decades there have been several so severe that many cattle died, some people starved, and many people had to emigrate temporarily or permanently just to survive.

Not only is starvation a danger many years, but people experience hunger every year. Hunger is taken on voluntarily during Ramadan, the Muslim month of fasting, and there are often times when for one reason or another people fail to eat for a day or two. Endemic diseases cause enormous suffering through pain, incapacitation, and death. The parasitic afflictions malaria and schistosomiasis are among the worst in this regard. Though smallpox has been eradicated, measles, whooping cough, and scarlet fever sometimes wipe out all the young children of a family, or many of those in a single community. Cerebrospinal meningitis can be arrested if the victim can be given the right treatment in time, but this is often impossible in the bush, far from the nearest clinic. We don't usually think of childbirth as a disease, but it is probably the leading cause of death for women of childbearing age in this area. Because people greatly desire to have children, pregnancy is also an occasion for satisfaction and hope, but an undercurrent of anxiety and fear is inescapable.

-30-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
First Find Your Child a Good Mother: The Construction of Self in Two African Communities
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS vi
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • PROLOGUE BURKINA FASO, 1974-76: A PERSONAL MEMOIR xiii
  • REFLEXIVITY IN HUMANISTIC ANTHROPOLOGY 1
  • I - Introduction 8
  • 2 - Global Fulani Society 14
  • 3 - Economy 30
  • 4 - What Life is All About 43
  • 5 - Infancy and Early Childhood 105
  • 6 - Later Childhood 130
  • 7 - Child Development in Fulani Ethnopsychology 160
  • 8 - Self, Identity, and Personality 184
  • 9 - Conclusion 196
  • Theoretical Implications 224
  • Notes 231
  • Bibliography 233
  • Index 237
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 244

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.