Theoretical Frameworks for Personal Relationships

By Ralph Erber ; Robin Gilmour | Go to book overview

ceived disadvantages of being single), the social pressure toward involvement in a partner relationship, poor health, and social anxiety. That factors such as reported health problems and social anxiety were associated with loneliness was not a new finding. What was new was that these factors were incorporated into a broader theoretical framework. Application of the theory directed the attention toward the examination of hypotheses of the form: Given the loneliness that arises from the perceived discrepancy between available relationships and relationship standards, under what conditions are widows and widowers likely to experience even stronger feelings of loneliness and under what conditions are they likely to be free from feelings of loneliness?

Although we consider the TMI to be potentially useful to relationship researchers, one should keep in mind what the theory can and cannot do. The TMI is not a psychological theory. It does not aim to provide insight into cognitive and perceptual processes. For example, although it specifies the conditions under which mental changes such as changes in standards are or are not likely to occur, it does not specify the nature of these changes or the mechanisms underlying them. Thus, although the TMI predicts when widowed men and women are likely to adapt to their partner standard, it does not unfold how the process takes place. To gain insight into how people come to have the standards they do, one must turn to other theories (e.g., psychological coping theories). As said, the usefulness of the TMI lies in the fact that it provides a general framework -- a framework with which it is possible to methodically analyze relationship phenomena. The general framework must be tailored to the specific problem at hand, and this can only be done if one has substantive knowledge about the specific problem.

We find it exciting to work with the TMI because it calls for a focus on different kinds of behaviors and their outcomes: overt, observable activities and covert, mental activities as different means of adapting to or overcoming unwanted situations. This multifaceted focus makes it different from most theories. In our view, the challenge for new relationship research lies in such an approach. More studies should examine the ongoing interdependence between what people expect from others, what people do to have their expectations met, and what the upshot of their endeavors is.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Work on this chapter was supported by grants from the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (N.W.O.) and the Queen Juliana Foundation (K.J.F.). The authors wish to thank Frits Tazelaar for his helpful comments on an earlier version of the manuscript.

-257-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Theoretical Frameworks for Personal Relationships
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 271

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.