The Vampyre, and Other Tales of the Macabre

By Robert Morrison; Chris Baldick | Go to book overview

THE CURSE

Anonymous

-----'The deed was foul, But grievously the forfeit has been paid.'

ASTOLPHO

I Am again free--free, save from the torture of my own thoughts, which, like the furies of old, are ever present to lash me. I am once more in the deserted home of my fathers--I am no longer a fettered maniac, crouching spaniel-like before the glare of my savage keeper. There is no one to whom I dare open my mind. It may be a childish morbid feeling, but still I dare not, cannot do it. The presence of man is hateful to me--all seem to look on me with loathing and hatred. I must unload my breast--I must give some vent to the fire which burns within me, and record my tale of desolation; any thing is preferable to unbroken silence; and it is matter of consolation that when I am gone, some perchance may pity me, when they peruse the strange record of my blasted fate.

The second son of a family more distinguished for unblemished antiquity than possessions or wealth, I was early thrown, in a great measure, on my own resources, and sought in foreign climes that fortune which there was no chance of finding at home. I was successful beyond hope or expectation; and, ere my health had been lost and strength wasted by the withering influence of a tropical clime, I was on my way homeward, rich almost beyond my wildest desires.

'Now am I indeed happy,' I exclaimed as the palm-clad hills of Bombay faded from my sight--'now am I happy indeed.' For home, with all its ecstatic associations, rushed full and strong on my mind; I had a father whom I revered--a brother whom I loved as brother never was loved before; I was going to see them, to live with them, never more to part. But there was one in whom was concentrated the love of father and of

-113-

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The Vampyre, and Other Tales of the Macabre
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • Introduction vii
  • Note on the Text xxiii
  • Select Bibliography xxv
  • Chronology of the Magazines xxvii
  • The Vampyre 3
  • Sir Guy Eveling''s Dream 25
  • Confessions of a Reformed Ribbonman 33
  • Monos and Daimonos 53
  • The Master of Logan 63
  • The Victim 87
  • Some Terrible Letters from Scotland 99
  • The Curse 113
  • Life in Death 129
  • My Hobby,--Rather 139
  • The Red Man 143
  • Post-Mortem Reflections of a Medical Lecturer 165
  • The Bride of Lindorf 175
  • Passage in the Secret History of an Irish Countess 201
  • Appendix A- PRELIMINARIES FOR THE VAMPYRE 235
  • Appendix B- NOTE ON THE VAMPYRE 244
  • Appendix C- AUGUSTUS DARVELL 246
  • Biographical Notes 253
  • Explanatory Notes 257
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