The Complete Odes and Epodes

By Horace; David West | Go to book overview

SECULAR HYMN

Phoebe silvarumque

Phoebus, and Diana, queen of forests,
shining glory of the sky, always worshipped
and always to be worshipped, grant our prayers
at this holy time

when the Sibylline verses have bidden
chaste and chosen boys and maidens
to sing a hymn to the gods who have loved
the seven hills.

Life-giving Sun, who with your gleaming chariot

display and then conceal the day, born for ever new 10
and for ever the same, nothing can you see greater than the city of Rome.

Ilithyia, who in season duly and gently open
the way to childbearing, protect all mothers,
whether your wish is to be called Lucina,
or Genitalis.

O goddess, bring the young to light, and prosper
the decrees of the Fathers which govern
the joining of man and woman, and ordain a law of marriage

rich in offspring, 20

and may each fixed cycle of a hundred years and ten bring back our hymns and games
crowded into three bright days
and three glad nights.

And you Parcae, ever singers of the truth, fulfil
what has been spoken--may the immovable boundary stone
of Fate preserve it--and join to our past greatness
a great destiny in the future.

-109-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Complete Odes and Epodes
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • THE COMPLETE ODES AND EPODES i
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS vi
  • Introduction vii
  • THE LIFE OF HORACE (believed to be an abbreviation of a Life by Suetonius) xxiv
  • NOTE ON THE TEXT xxviii
  • SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY xxx
  • CHRONOLOGICAL SURVEY xxxii
  • Epodes 1
  • Odes, Book I 25
  • Odes, Book II 56
  • Odes, Book III 76
  • Secular Hymn 109
  • Odes, Book IV 112
  • EXPLANATORY NOTES 132
  • GLOSSARY 193
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 200

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.