Russia after the War: Hopes, Illusions, and Disappointments, 1945-1957

By Elena Zubkova; Hugh Ragsdale | Go to book overview

Introduction

For some people Russia has been a mysterious sphinx, for others an improbable monster. Their interest has always been characterized by a certain pragmatic consideration, whether prompted by the novels of Dostoevskii or nourished by fears of the Evil Empire. Few eras in the history of Russia, however, have been as obscure and enigmatic as the high-water mark of Stalinism, the period between the victory of 1945 and Khrushchev's famous denunciation of the tyrant in 1956. Fortunately, thanks to the blessings of glasnost, we are now in a position to assess this grim and dramatic subject on the basis of authentic historical records.

We must not imagine that Soviet history can be confined to the chronological boundaries 1917-1991. In fact, we Russians still labor psychologically under the legacy of the Soviet past. The majority of living Russians were born and acquired their social consciousness in the Soviet period. The older people among us lived through the war and the eras of Stalin and Khrushchev and have their own conception of those times. Their personal impressions and experience represent an enormous fund of social memory crucial to an understanding of both our past and present, and the serious historian is hardly entitled to sacrifice this living, contemporary history to subjects more abstract and farther afield.

After the great expansion of interest in social history during the past few years, the importance of mind-sets and public opinion is no longer an unfamiliar idea. Still, research in the social psychology and cultural anthropology of the Soviet period is only now beginning to take shape. Until recently our entrenched historiographic tradition was dominated by political research. Soviet history was represented chiefly as the record of isolated decisions made on high, while the

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Russia after the War: Hopes, Illusions, and Disappointments, 1945-1957
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 240

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.