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European Feminisms, 1700-1950: A Political History

By Karen Offen | Go to book overview

Chronology

A Framework for the Study of European Feminisms
1622 De l'Égalité des hommes et des femmes by Marie de Gournay
1648 Treaty of Westphalia ends the Thirty Years War
1673 De l'Égalité des deux sexes by François Poullain de la Barre offers
proposition that "the mind has no sex"
1686 Founding of the Maison Royale de Saint Louis at Saint-Cyr, a secular
school for noble daughters, by Madame de Maintenon, morga
natic wife of Louis XIV
1687 De l'Éducation des filles by François de Salignac de la Mothe-
Fénelon argues that girls should be formed to be competent wives
and mothers, not bels esprits or bluestockings; women half the
human race
1694 Serious Proposal to the Ladies by Mary Astell advocates a women's
university and women's communities for those who prefer not to
marry
1721 Montesquieu publishes his Lettres persanes
1732 Laura Bassi receives doctoral degree in philosophy, University of Bo
logna
1739 Woman Not Inferior to Man by "Sophia, a Person of Quality"
La Defensa de las mujeres by Benito Feijóo ( Spain)
1742 Dorothea Christine Leporin Erxleben argues for women's right to
university study
1745 Madame de Pompadour presented at court as the official mistress of
Louis XV
1748 Montesquieu's L'Esprit des lois discusses women's position under
three forms of government
1756 In L'Encyclopédie, vol. 6, Jaucourt raises the possibility that the
subordination of wives to husbands in marriage is a social con
struction
1758 Exchange between Jean le Rond d'Alembert and Jean-Jacques
-59 Rousseau over women's emancipation
Female Rights Vindicated by "A Lady"
1761 Publication of Rousseau's Julie and Émile
-62

-xix-

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