European Feminisms, 1700-1950: A Political History

By Karen Offen | Go to book overview

Notes

PROLOGUE
1.
For a discussion defining feminism and delineating the subject of study in historical feminisms, see Chapter 1 below.
2.
Madame Avril de Sainte-Croix, Le Féminisme ( Paris: V. Giard & E. Brière, 1907), p. 6. This writer's first name has been given variously as Ghénia and as Adrienne.
3.
Millicent Garrett Fawcett, "Introduction", in H. M. Swanwick, The Future of the Women's Movement ( London: G. Bell, 1913), xii.
4.
Ellen Key, Love and Marriage, transl. Arthur G. Chater ( New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911), p. 214. Originally published in Swedish as Lifslinjer af Ellen Key, 1904.
5.
Simone de Beauvoir, "Introduction", in The Second Sex, transl. and ed. H. M. Parshley ( New York: The Modern Library, 1968; originally published in 2 vols. in French, 1949), xix.
6.
Dale Spender, "Introduction", in Time and Tide Wait for No Man ( London: Pandora Press, 1987), p. 2.
7.
The two books in question are Richard J. Evans, The Feminists: Women's Emancipation Movements in Europe, America and Australasia, 1840-1920 ( London: Croom Helm; New York: Barnes & Noble, 1977), and Jane Rendall, The Origins of Modern Feminism: Women in Britain, France, and the United States, 1780-1860 ( London: Macmillan, 1983; New York: Schocken, 1984). See my discussion of these earlier works and others in "Challenging Male Hegemony: Feminist Criticism and the Context for Women's Movements in the Age of European Revolutions and Counter- Revolutions, 1789-1860," paper presented at the conference on women's movements in nineteenth-century Europe, Stuttgart/Birkach, 31 May-4 June 1995, in press.
8.
See the insightful discussion of these issues in Marilyn J. Boxer, When Women Ask the Questions: Creating Women's Studies in America ( Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998), prol. 6.
9.
For France, see Françoise Thébaud, Écrire l'histoire des femmes (Fontenay Saint-Cloud: ENS Éditions, 1998); for many other European countries, see the essays in Writing Women's History: International Perspectives, ed. Karen Offen, Ruth Roach Pierson, & Jane Rendall ( London: Macmillan; Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1991).

-399-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
European Feminisms, 1700-1950: A Political History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 554

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.