Aruba Past and Present: From the Time of the Indians until Today

By Johan Hartog; J. A. Verleun | Go to book overview

SIXTH CHAPTER 1816-1924
A PERIOD OF REST

Oranjestad

JUST OVER SEVENTEEN HUNDRED PEOPLE LIVED ON ARUBA IN 1816. In the period covered by this chapter their number increased to something under nine thousand.

The trade to the Gulf of Maracaibo was a transit-trade; shipments were received from Curaçao merchants and return-cargoes consisting of dye-wood and goatskins were sent there. Eight merchants and eight shopkeepers resided on our island, as well as 78 sailors. Fishing was only carried on in "canoas". Of the 319 persons whose calling was known 194 were planters. There must have been a moderate prosperity, since two goldsmiths found occupation here.

Public buildings (the commander's house, the "horsemen's houses", the soldiers' quarters and Fort Zoutman) had fallen into a state of disrepair.

An inventory of Fort Zoutman makes it very clear that government- property was in a sadly neglected condition. It consisted of "two benches, two tables, two iron pots, four halivats (an Aruban measure, half vat, about 8 gallons), two water-casks, a soldiers' quarters, 17 workable and defective muskets, and 20 cartridge-pouches.

With regard to private houses nothing was reported. The garden or "bakkoval" at Fontein according to old usage served as "special allowance" for the commander.

All the soil belonged to the government, but Aruba was not classed as a government plantation like Bonaire. However, those cultivating the little gardens or cunucus did not pay leases. Rates were not levied, but every inhabitant was obliged to work two days a week for the government, a kind of statute labour. It was possible, however, to have oneself replaced by a slave.

When more people got an opportunity to settle here the feudal laws maintained by the Dutch West India Company until 1791, which had been left intact by the government afterwards, could no longer be kept up. In 1823 the whole of Aruba was still regarded as crown-land. In that year the residents were permitted to obtain the ownership of the land they had received as concessionaries by purchase. The gold-finds of 1824

-167-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Aruba Past and Present: From the Time of the Indians until Today
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 454

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.