Cruel and Unusual: The Supreme Court and Capital Punishment

By Michael Meltsner | Go to book overview

15
Closing In

"The California Supreme Court is to the courts what U.C.L.A. is to basketball."

ANTHONY G. AMSTERDAM

Senate deliberations had caused the Justices to delay hearing the four death penalty cases until January; the several months' postponement turned out to be a critical break for the abolitionists.

The new turn of events began late one afternoon in early December 1971, when Jerome Falk received a call from G. E. Bishel, the clerk of the California Supreme Court. Bishel explained that in January the court was going to hear still another appeal in the case of Robert Page Anderson, the same man whose challenge to the California death penalty the court had rejected in 1968. Anderson had won a new penalty trial on Witherspoon grounds, but the trial court had resentenced him to death. Anderson's lawyer had died. The court, Bishel continued, intended to reconsider the cruel and unusual punishment issue and to schedule the case for argument at the earliest convenient date. Would Falk or Amsterdam be willing to represent Anderson, file a brief, and argue the case?

After he recovered his composure, Falk quickly told

-266-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Cruel and Unusual: The Supreme Court and Capital Punishment
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - The Fund 3
  • 2 - The Court 20
  • 3 - The Facts of Death 45
  • 4 - The Strategy Unfolds 60
  • 5 - The Race Factor 73
  • 6 - Moratorium 106
  • 7 - Simon's Frolic 126
  • 8 - Maxwell 149
  • 9 - Boykin 168
  • 10 - Haynsworth, Carswell, and Blackmun 186
  • 11 - Maxwell (Continued) 199
  • 12 - Taking Stock 214
  • 13 - If the Death Penalty Is to Be Retained at All 229
  • 14 - Powell and Rehnquist 253
  • 15 - Closing In 266
  • 16 - Cruel and Unusual 286
  • Index 329
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 342

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.