The Columbia History of British Poetry

By Carl Woodring; James Shapiro | Go to book overview

Spenser, Sidney, Jonson

SPENSER, SIDNEY, AND JONSON stand out, among their Eliza bethan and Jacobean peers, as poets of the English Renaissance. They not only contributed to the body of writings that made English poetry worthy of comparison with the Greek and Latin classics--the ambition common to the modern vernacular literatures that partly constitute the Renaissance as a cultural movement--they consciously cultivated various ancient and modern genres that, once given a local habitation, entitled English poetry to be considered part of European literature. Spenser, regularly compared by contemporaries to Virgil, emulated the Roman poet's career by writing an inaugural book of eclogues ( The Shepheardes Calender), which was the groundwork for a national epic, The Faerie Queene. Sidney, although not the first to write love sonnets in English, deserved to be called the "English Petrarch" as author of the first true sonnet sequence, that is, a collection that continuously represents a single love situation and uses it to evaluate love as emotional experience, social phenomenon, and cosmic reality. Jonson domesticated the verse letters of Horace, claimed to write the first true epigrams in English (in imitation of the Roman poet Martial), and cast one of his greatest lyrics in the form of a Pindaric ode (another "first" in English).

Exact contemporaries and well acquainted, although not social equals, Spenser and Sidney must have regarded each other as collaborators in establishing the authority of English poetry. But Jonson-- whose most famous remark about Spenser is that "in affecting the

-203-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Columbia History of British Poetry
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 740

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.