The Tragic Conflict: The Civil War and Reconstruction

By William B. Hesseltine | Go to book overview

15
With Sherman

George W. Pepper

Sherman's triumphal march to the sea is the most stupendous movement of this or any other age. Never, perhaps, did the name of any one of our great generals so widely and deeply stir the public mind. The wheels of commerce, hard to stay as the sun upon his march, stood still; the strifes of party, restless as the sea, and unmanageable as the winds, were calmed; people of all countries and tongues were drawn to one spot.

The spectacle was most inspiring, as the stream of the long, long procession came flowing out of the Gate City with their flags waving in the winds of Heaven, and swords and bayonets glistening in the sun. The splendid regiments of Slocum's column, moved as if on parade, with waving banners and strains of martial music. The whole programme comprised a magnificent pageant, beautiful to behold. The bronzed countenances of the men who carried muskets were suffused with one expression, and the thoughts and feelings were so much alike that it might be said the hearts of thousands were as the heart of one man.

The order for the expedition was issued on the 8th of November from Kingston, northwest from Atlanta, around which place the army was again concentrated. In this order Sherman says: "It is sufficient for you to know that it involves a departure from our present base, and a long and difficult march to a new one. All the chances of war have been considered and provided for as far as human sagacity can...."

Sherman, starting out from Atlanta with his army at this season of the year, is an event of the largest suggestiveness. He proposed, after gathering sufficient supplies at Atlanta, to abandon the railroad from Chattanooga to Atlanta, and start with a movable column on a winter tour of the Cotton States. Two of his army corps will be left at Chattanooga to watch Hood's movements, while the rest of the corps will cut loose from all lines of supply and push across the States of Georgia and the Carolinas. He will take with him such supplies as can be carried conveniently, and when these are exhausted, will live upon the country. Of his destination nothing is known.

GEORGE W. PEPPER, Personal Recollections of Sherman's Campaigns in Georgia and the Carolinas ( Zanesville, Ohio, 1866), Chs. xvii-xix.

-227-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Tragic Conflict: The Civil War and Reconstruction
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 528

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.