Tin Soldiers on Jerusalem Beach

By Amia Lieblich | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

A word for all the people who made this endeavor possible. The list is practically endless.

My parents taught me respect for the written word and, in respecting and saving my earliest creative products, have built in me the knowledge that I could write. My husband and children provided me with warmth and courage, thus creating the conditions I needed for this work. Jim Simkin of Big Sur, California, has been my constant guide in Gestalt therapy. My conversations with him, in real life and on the empty chair, have repeatedly given me a renewed sense of direction.

The deepest gratitude I owe is, naturally, toward my clients, group members, and interviewees. In confiding in me and in giving me permission to write, they laid the path upon which I am treading. This book is theirs as much as it is mine.

People who read the manuscript in its different phases were also of great help to me. In Amherst, Massachusetts, where I started to write during my sabbatical, colleagues from the Psychology Department, in particular Harold Raush and Sheldon Cashdan, made some very helpful comments, while my friends and group members of the Everywoman Center -- Ute, Arleen, and many others -- shared my progress and crises as only sisters can.

As various ideas about the final conception of the book were evolving, I got immensely important suggestions from David and Sheila Rothman of New York and from André Schiffrin of Pantheon Books, all of whom visited Jerusalem in the spring of 1977. This started a long correspondence relationship with André Schiffrin, joined later by Donna Bass, who edited the book with great care and understanding, and helped me in

-xi-

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Tin Soldiers on Jerusalem Beach
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Part 1 - VVhen Cannons Are Stilled, Let Voices Be Heard 1
  • Six Wars 3
  • On War and Sanity 7
  • Overview of Gestalt Therapy 11
  • The Groups 18
  • Reactions 21
  • Tin Soldiers on Jerusalem Beach 24
  • Part 2 - The Unfinished Business of War in Israel 25
  • War as a Symbol 27
  • On Freedom and Country 46
  • Reminders of the Holocaust 75
  • War and the Family 95
  • Early Effects of the War 116
  • The Wheelchair Group of 1974__ 143
  • New Group, Old War 160
  • The Shadow of War 193
  • Part 3 - Peacetime Conversations About War 205
  • The Women 261
  • About the Book 289
  • Recommended Readings 305
  • About the Author *
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