Church Cooperation in the United States: The Nation-Wide Backgrounds and Ecumenical Significance of State and Local Councils of Churches in Their Historical Perspective

By Ross W. Sanderson | Go to book overview

REFERENCE NOTES

Chapter IX
1
Gray, op. cit., p. 157.
2
See Staff Titles in Local Councils, App. V., pp. 114, 115, and in State Councils, App. VI, pp. 116, 117, in Miller, Christian Unity--Its Relevance to the Community.
3
The Church Woman, December, 1952.
15
Ibid., as reported in the March number of each succeeding year, state and local contributions to DUCW amounted to
1953$42,870
195445,062
195545,685
195647,000
195749,694
195850,346
18
Ibid., August-September 1954, p. 39 (also mimeographed 8/2/54.)
19
As distinguished from the number of persons noted earlier.
20
Cf. International Journal, December, 1953, Elizabeth Longwell: "The Virginia State Council Services Local Communities". (More than 52,000 pupils are enrolled, 96% of the pupils in the grades where the program is offered. Nearly a third of these pupils have little or no connection with the church. Nearly 400 communities are served.)
21
Tabulation of the geographical distribution of subscribers to The Church Woman as of March 10, 1953 (back cover of April, 1953 issue), and December 1, 1958 (map, pp. 20, 21, August-September, 1959), visualizes the widespread and increasing interest in co-operative women's work throughout the nation. Excluding 246 foreign subscriptions, there were 19,932 subscribers to this journal in 1953, ranging from 36 in Nevada and in Utah to 1,369 in New York State; in 1958 the domestic total had increased to 27,655, ranging from 8 in Alaska to 1,903 in Ohio. Started as a quarterly bulletin of the NCFW in 1935, and in 1938 becoming the joint publication of the three groups merged in the 1941 UCCW, The Church Woman celebrated its 25th anniversary in 1959.
22
The figures used are compiled from Numbers 1 to 10 of the invaluable Financial Counciling, issued by the Office for Councils of Churches, and prepared by W. P. Buckwalter, Jr.
23
E.g., on age groups, alcohol, camping, drama, missions, peace, race relations, worship, etc.

-231-

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Church Cooperation in the United States: The Nation-Wide Backgrounds and Ecumenical Significance of State and Local Councils of Churches in Their Historical Perspective
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Foreword 7
  • Preface 9
  • Some Interdenomination Abbreviations 11
  • Chapter I The American Scene 12
  • Reference Notes 28
  • Chapter II The Sunday School Movement In the United States 31
  • Reference Notes 52
  • Chapter III Federative Progress, 1900-1908 54
  • Reference Notes 75
  • Chapter IV Shakedown Voyage, 1908-1915 77
  • Reference Notes 98
  • Chapter V First Period of Expansion, 1915-1924 99
  • Reference Notes 123
  • Chapter VI Appraisal and Testing, 1925-1931 125
  • Reference Notes 149
  • Chapter VII The Merging Thirties 152
  • Reference Notes 179
  • Chapter VIII The Expectant Forties 182
  • Reference Notes 204
  • Chapter IX Since 1950, Solid Growth 205
  • Reference Notes 231
  • Chapter X Meanings and Expectations 233
  • Reference Notes 252
  • Appendix I 259
  • Appendix II 262
  • Index 267
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