The Book of Sonnet Sequences

By Houston Peterson | Go to book overview

INDEX OF FIRST LINES

CONRAD AIKEN
PAGE
Broad on the sunburnt hill the bright moon comes, 433
Imprimis: I forgot all day your face, 435
Here's daffodil -- here's tulip -- here's the leaf 437
Here's Nature: it's a spider in a flower, 436
My love, I have betrayed you seventy times 434
My love, my love, take back that word, unsay 436
Think, when a starry night of bitter frost 434
What lunacy is this, that night long tries, 435
What music's devious voice can say, beguiling 433

WILFRID SCAWEN BLUNT
A glorious triumph. On that day of days 317
Alas, poor Queen of Beauty! In my heart 311
A little honey! Ay, a little sweet, 304
And so we went our way, -- yes, hand in hand, 323
And thus it is. The tale I have to tell 304
An instant, just an instant, and no more, 307
A second warning, nor unheeded. Yet 309
At such a time indeed of youth's first morn, 316
Beyond her sat a second monster. She 308
For Esther was a woman most complete 329
He who has once heen happy is for aye 327
How shall I tell my fall? The life of man 324
"I do not doubt it. You have a look of truth" 321
If I have since done evil in my life, 313
I fled into the bosom of the night, 312
I fled the booth with feelings as of Cain, 312
I followed dumb and shrinking like a thief 325
I had been an hour at Lyons. My breath came 305
I had made my round, as yet with little gain 306

-439-

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