Thinking Queer: Sexuality, Culture, and Education

By Susan Talburt; Shirley R. Steinberg | Go to book overview

Works Cited

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Bailey, L. W. 1996. The no-thing-ness of near-death experiences. In The near-death experience: A reader, edited by Lee W. Bailey and Jenny Yattes. New York: Routledge.

Bell, D. and G. Valentine. 1995. The sexed self: Strategies of performance, sites of resistance. In Mapping the subject: Geographies of cultural transformation, edited by Steve Pile and Nigel Thrift. New York: Routledge.

Berlant, L. and M. Warner. 1995. What does queer theory teach us about x? PMLA 110, no. 3: 343-49.

Blessing, J. 1997. Prose is a prose is a prose: Gender performance in photography. In Prose is a prose is a prose: Gender performance in photography, edited by Jennifer Blessing. New York: Guggenheim Museum Publications.

Bohm, D. 1978. The implicate order. Process Studies 8, no. 2: 73-99.

Bredbeck, W., M. Gonzalez, and S. Waldrep. 1996. Queer studies and the job market: Three perspectives. Profession 1996: 82-90.

Britzman, D. 1996. "On becoming a little sex researcher": Some comments on a polymorphously perverse curriculum. JCT. An Interdisciplinary Journal of Curriculum Studies 12, no. 2: 4-11.

Butler, J. 1990. Gender trouble: Feminism and the subversion of identity. New York: Routledge.

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