Assessing Communication Education: A Handbook for Media, Speech, and Theatre Educators

By William G. Christ | Go to book overview

APPENDIX B: SAMPLE ASSESSMENT PLAN
OutcomeInstructionAssessment

By the end of the course,

During the course, the

At the end of the course,
the student will be able: student will: the student will:
To explain factors that Hear a lecture on self- Respond to multiple-choice
influence self-concept such concept. Discuss factors in questions on self-concept
as looking-glass theory and relation to story, "Cypher
social comparison theory. in the Snow."
To list and explain five Hear a lecture on self- Respond to multiple-choice
principles of appropriate disclosure. Complete and questions on self-disclosure.
self-disclosure. discuss Jourard's self
disclosure inventory.
To use self-disclosure in an Participate in paraphrasing Compare self-disclosure
appropriate manner to exercise. levels between a precourse
build the relationship. assessment and postcourse
assessment using the CSRS
( Spitzberg & Hurt, 1987)
To be more willing to self- Participate in trust-building Compare precourse and
disclose. exercises. postcourses on Willingness
to Communicate Scale.
To explain the listening Hear a lecture on listening. Respond to multiple-choice
process. questions on listening.
To be better listeners. Complete various listening Compare a precourse
exercises and activities. standardized listening
assessment with a
postcourse retest.

Ultimately a detailed plan such as the one presented here allows faculty to tailor their assessment to the instruction that is offered in their department and their courses. In this case, the plan meant that certain assessments were administered on a pre-and postcourse basis so that levels of improvement could be determined. Other assessments such as the final multiplechoice examination were used only at the completion of the course.

Although initially very time consuming, course-by-course plans can be integrated to articulate the plan for the entire department. Most outside agencies that are now mandating assessment will be satisfied with departments that can articulate this kind of detailed approach. For the department itself, this approach can help to identify and correct weaknesses and provide further information for the planning of courses and programs. Because the assessment is tailored to the course or program, results provide much more relevant information.


REFERENCES

Adler, R. B., Rosenfeld, L. B., & Towne, N. ( 1989). Interplay. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston.

Aitken, J. E., & Neer, M. ( 1992). "A faculty program of assessment for a college level competency-based communicator core curriculum". Communication Education, 41, 270-285.

-253-

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Assessing Communication Education: A Handbook for Media, Speech, and Theatre Educators
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments x
  • I - Background 1
  • 1 - Assessment: An Overview 3
  • APPENDIX B: NATIONAL EDUCATION GOAL 5 OBJECTIVES 23
  • References 26
  • 2 - Mission Statements, Outcomes, and the New Liberal Arts 31
  • APPENDIX A: PROGRAM ASSESSMENT AUDIT 49
  • References 53
  • 3 - Regional Accrediting Association Requirements and the Development of Outcomes Statements 57
  • APPENDIX A: GENERAL FRAMEWORK FOR AN ASSESSMENT PROGRAM 83
  • References 85
  • II - Broad Assessment Strategies 87
  • 4 - Teaching Evaluation 89
  • APPENDIX A: EXERCISE 109
  • References 111
  • 5 - Course Evaluation 113
  • APPENDIX A: COURSE EVALUATION QUESTIONS 127
  • References 129
  • 6 - Student Portfolios 131
  • APPENDIX A: ORGANIZATIONAL PACKET AND INSTRUCTIONS 146
  • References 154
  • 7 - The Capstone Course 155
  • APPENDIX A: ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE MISSION STATEMENT 171
  • References 178
  • 8 - Internships, Exit Interviews, and Advisory Boards 181
  • APPENDIX A: APPLICATION FOR PROFESSIONAL INTERNSHIP 195
  • References 200
  • III - Context-Specific Assessmento Strategies 201
  • 9 - Oral Communication Assessment: An Overview 203
  • References 216
  • 10 - Public Speaking 219
  • ACKNOWLEDGMENT 235
  • References 235
  • 11 - Interpersonal Communication 237
  • APPENDIX A: ASSESSMENT OVERVIEW 252
  • References 253
  • 12 - Small Group /Communication 257
  • APPENDIX A: SMALL GROUP COMMUNICATION COMPETENCIES 285
  • References 285
  • 13 - Organizational Communication 291
  • References 305
  • 14 - Assessment in Theatre Programs 311
  • APPENDIX A: THEATRE ORGANIZATIONS 327
  • References 332
  • 15 - Using Accreditation for Assessment 333
  • APPENDIX A: DEPARTMENT GOALS 342
  • References 348
  • 16 - Exit Examinations for the Media Major 351
  • References 381
  • Author Index 383
  • Subject Index 391
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