Assessing Communication Education: A Handbook for Media, Speech, and Theatre Educators

By William G. Christ | Go to book overview

14
Assessment in Theatre Programs

Mark J. Malinauskas Gary T. Hunt Murray State University

Assessment in theatre programs, because of the field's fine arts tradition, presents unique challenges. This chapter provides the reader an overview of theatre education assessment and considers important issues including the role of professional organizations, a rationale for undertaking assessment, the practical steps in carrying out an assessment plan, and the assessment of general education theatre courses. This chapter's discussion includes a variety of assessment strategies including the use of capstone experiences, exit interviews, and alumni surveys.


INTRODUCTION

National efforts to develop broad profiles of information about academic program quality have become a reality for most institutions of higher education. Often the composition of these profiles is determined by individuals who are not part of the staff of the university. Legislators and bureaucrats in statewide coordinating offices and discipline leaders, who usually have their offices inside the Washington Beltway, often determine what we in higher education must do as we attempt to respond to calls for assessment of student outcomes in higher education. The guidelines, parameters, and the assessment agenda are often determined by individuals who, although very interested in their respective disciplines, have had no direct administrative experience in providing the data requested through assessment mandates. It is within this confusing assessment framework that administrators in higher education must function. Often administrators perceive that they must respond to requests for data that are well removed from their daily activities of running an academic program.

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Assessing Communication Education: A Handbook for Media, Speech, and Theatre Educators
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments x
  • I - Background 1
  • 1 - Assessment: An Overview 3
  • APPENDIX B: NATIONAL EDUCATION GOAL 5 OBJECTIVES 23
  • References 26
  • 2 - Mission Statements, Outcomes, and the New Liberal Arts 31
  • APPENDIX A: PROGRAM ASSESSMENT AUDIT 49
  • References 53
  • 3 - Regional Accrediting Association Requirements and the Development of Outcomes Statements 57
  • APPENDIX A: GENERAL FRAMEWORK FOR AN ASSESSMENT PROGRAM 83
  • References 85
  • II - Broad Assessment Strategies 87
  • 4 - Teaching Evaluation 89
  • APPENDIX A: EXERCISE 109
  • References 111
  • 5 - Course Evaluation 113
  • APPENDIX A: COURSE EVALUATION QUESTIONS 127
  • References 129
  • 6 - Student Portfolios 131
  • APPENDIX A: ORGANIZATIONAL PACKET AND INSTRUCTIONS 146
  • References 154
  • 7 - The Capstone Course 155
  • APPENDIX A: ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE MISSION STATEMENT 171
  • References 178
  • 8 - Internships, Exit Interviews, and Advisory Boards 181
  • APPENDIX A: APPLICATION FOR PROFESSIONAL INTERNSHIP 195
  • References 200
  • III - Context-Specific Assessmento Strategies 201
  • 9 - Oral Communication Assessment: An Overview 203
  • References 216
  • 10 - Public Speaking 219
  • ACKNOWLEDGMENT 235
  • References 235
  • 11 - Interpersonal Communication 237
  • APPENDIX A: ASSESSMENT OVERVIEW 252
  • References 253
  • 12 - Small Group /Communication 257
  • APPENDIX A: SMALL GROUP COMMUNICATION COMPETENCIES 285
  • References 285
  • 13 - Organizational Communication 291
  • References 305
  • 14 - Assessment in Theatre Programs 311
  • APPENDIX A: THEATRE ORGANIZATIONS 327
  • References 332
  • 15 - Using Accreditation for Assessment 333
  • APPENDIX A: DEPARTMENT GOALS 342
  • References 348
  • 16 - Exit Examinations for the Media Major 351
  • References 381
  • Author Index 383
  • Subject Index 391
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