Assessing Communication Education: A Handbook for Media, Speech, and Theatre Educators

By William G. Christ | Go to book overview
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current course content expanded. Once that view is clear, the department can enumerate instructional goals, both departmentwide and sequence specific, examples of which are shown in Appendix A.Next, departments should describe how they will measure outcomes. In most cases, some data are already available. Departments that already use exit interviews should glean outcome information from those (see chap. 8). Sometimes outsider evaluations of interns are routinely gathered and that information can be useful. Some institutions regularly survey students and alumni, and those results are almost always applicable to outcomes assessment.Units may want to start slowly with the new measurement of only one or two outcomes at a time. Appendix B suggests ways to measure a single outcome, ability to perform in a professional setting.Finally, once an assessment is made, the unit should report the results, as in Appendix C, to whomever should receive them: perhaps the chief academic officer of the institution and the unit head or dean, and certainly the department's faculty. When results are highly positive, as they often are, departments like to highlight them in alumni newsletters. Certainly, as Lovell ( 1993) suggested, the information gathered during accreditation studies and outcomes assessments becomes the obvious focus of future outcomes objectives. For further discussion see Appendix D.
APPENDIX A: DEPARTMENT GOALS

Department of Journalism

Department Goals Statement
The Department of Journalism seeks to assure that its graduates have a strong grounding in the liberal arts and possess the knowledge and skills of the profession necessary not only for successful entry-level performance but also for lifelong careers of ever-increasing responsibility and influence.
Instructional Objectives for All Journalism Majors

Knowledge:
1. Knowledge of the nature and functions of contemporary mass media.
2. Knowledge of the history of national and international mass communication.
3. Appreciation for the unique role and responsibility of mass communication in a democracy.
4. Knowledge of the Constitutional provisions relating to freedom of the press and expression.

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Assessing Communication Education: A Handbook for Media, Speech, and Theatre Educators
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