Jews against Zionism: The American Council for Judaism, 1942-1948

By Thomas A. Kolsky | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 6
The Search for Compromise in Palestine

The Anglo-American Committee of Inquiry: An Attempt at Compromise

Between January 1946 and February 1947, the Palestine question emerged as a major international problem. The period began on a promising note, with the United States and Great Britain cooperating in an effort to find a compromise solution. It proved a difficult task.

The Anglo-American Committee of Inquiry ( AACI), the formation of which had been announced simultaneously on 13 November 1945 by President Harry Truman and Foreign Secretary Ernest Bevin, was a joint attempt by the United States and Great Britain to resolve the Palestine impasse. It was instructed to examine the condition of European Jews, to evaluate, in consultation with representatives of Arabs and Jews, the prospects for Jewish immigration to Palestine, and to recommend temporary and permanent solutions for these problems. The British and the Americans differed significantly in their expectations of the AACI. Bevin hoped it would become a means for committing the United States to a joint policy on Palestine, including financial and military assistance. Truman, however, wanted it to serve as an instrument for sanctioning the quick evacuation of many nonrepatriable Europeans. 1

The AACI consisted of six Americans and six Englishmen, including American and British cochairmen. It was headed by Joseph Hutcheson, a federal judge from Texas, and Sir John Singleton, a judge of Britain's High Court. The other American members were Frank W. Buxton, editor of the Boston Herald; James G. McDonald, former League of Nations high commissioner for German refugees; Bartley C. Crum, a San Francisco attorney; William Phillips, former undersecretary of state; and Frank Aydelotte, director of the Institute for Advanced International Studies at Princeton University and former president of Swarthmore College. The remaining five British members were Wilfred P. Crick, Midland Bank economic

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