East Central Europe and the World: Developments in the Post-Stalin Era

By Stephen D. Kertesz; Karlis Kalnins et al. | Go to book overview

PREFACE

The Fate of East Central Europe: Hopes and Failures of American Foreign Policy, published in 1956 by Notre Dame's Committee on International Relations, examined America's twentieth-century relations with the East Central European countries especially the international political conditions which made possible their subjugation after the Second World War--and the methods through which communism was imposed on them.

The present volume deals with East Central European events in the post-Stalin era, in particular since 1956. Its central purpose is to analyze the continuing Soviet domination of countries in the area and developments in some countries on the periphery of the Soviet orbit. The Baltic nations have lost separate statehood, while Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Rumania and Bulgaria have retained formal independence under Soviet-protected governments. The Yugoslav people experience Tito's brand of communism. The Albanian communist regime, first sponsored by Yugoslavia, then taken under the wing of the Soviet Union, since 1960 has been patronized by Communist China. In no case has a communist government acquired power at the polls or dared to test popular will in free elections. Police methods in internal affairs and a new version of imperialism in foreign affairs have marked communist policies.

The fate of the satellite countries transcends in significance the particulars of their own experience and is of importance in worldwide relations. For noncommunist nations their fate should be a writing on the wall. Premier Khrushchev has condemned some of Stalin's abuses and crimes, but does not abandon Stalin's principles in international politics; he merely practices them in a more flexible way. While the Soviet Union is the self-appointed champion of liberation and freedom in Asia, Africa, and Latin America, East Central European nations with a long record of independent existence are ruled by an iron fist and are forcibly separated from the rest of Europe. The diplomatic performance of Soviet representatives is characterized by double talk. Everywhere they advocate national

-vii-

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East Central Europe and the World: Developments in the Post-Stalin Era
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Previous Volumes in The International Studies Series ii
  • Title Page iv
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • 1: Another Five Years 1
  • Part One Internal Developments And Foreign Relations 19
  • 2: Baltic States 21
  • 3: Poland 45
  • 4: East Germany 64
  • 5: Czechoslovakia 95
  • 7: Rumania 156
  • 8: Bulgaria 169
  • 11: China: A New Power in Europe 264
  • Part Two On the Periphery Of The Soviet Orbit 279
  • 13: Finland 314
  • 14: Austria, 1955-1961 338
  • Part Three The West And East Central Europe 355
  • 15: American and West European Policy Toward East Central Europe Since Stalin 357
  • Index 377
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