CHAPTER VIII
DISSOCIATION AND ALLIED PHENOMENA

He who is fatally diseased in one organ necessarily pays the penalty with his life, though all the others be in perfect health. -- DRUMMOND

In all our discussions hitherto we have tried to emphasize the notion that no function of the organism is a strictly local affair but that the functions we have described are illustrations of the unity of the organism. Our observations concerning the developing of the vast network of conditioned reactions that is implied in acquiring education and skill suggest the interdependence of all of a vast number of part systems of nerve-muscle-gland connections -- many more indeed than can be traced by laboratory technique of the most refined order that has been devised to the present. For even our higher mental processes are conceived as one aspect of processes within such systems, even though they be temporary and less firmly knitted as compared with the bases of, for example, our prepotent reflexes and the like. This means that every act of thinking, as well as every emotional stirring, every act of observing, etc. is the only act that can occur in view of all the attendant circumstances in the organism as a whole. And this in turn means that there are organized systems within systems. We are more ready to demonstrate our knee jerk reactions when we find ourselves in the reaction chair in the laboratory than when we are sitting at dinner, though we may make the demonstration in the latter situation, too. And are we not much more predisposed to think out our problems in chemistry when we are in the laboratory confronted by our array of test tubes than when we are on the golf links? But we may, nevertheless, revert to these problems on the green. Moreover, at our study desk we are all set to think of our scientific hobby and we pursue it with persistence and determination. Other subjects are not likely to break in, although they may do so. We may turn aside in our thinking from our scientific to our literary hobby or to a prospective game of golf. All this is saying that, after a manner of speaking, our personalities are composed of compartments that are more or less insulated against one another.

-131-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Criminology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 468

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.