CHAPTER XVII
EXTRA-INSTITUTIONAL TREATMENT OF CRIMINALS

The liberty to go higher than we are is given only when we have fulfilled amply the duty of our present sphere. -- BEECHER

All the provision for labor and wages in penal institutions, and for education and sanitation, for religious life, and all other devices that have been created within the institution are so many attempts by the authorities to develop suitable social attitudes among prisoners. They are safeguards against the deteriorative effects of unmitigated incarceration.

Certain extra-institutional treatment has been generally provided to be interposed between the close of a period of actual confinement within the walls and final unconditional release from custody. This is parole or conditional release. There is now no one of the United States of America that does not employ parole in some if not all cases as a final measure before unconditional release.1 It is ordinarily coupled with a modified form of indeterminate sentence wherein the trial court decrees that imprisonment shall be for not less than a minimum term nor greater than a maximum. When the prisoner is approaching the end of the minimum period he automatically comes before a Board of Parole, for instance, that has been appointed by the Governor of the State. This board considers every case individually, having before it the prisoner's behavior record in the institution, his prospects for suitable employment outside, and (in the most progressive jurisdictions) data concerning his mental and physical health. If the conclusion of the enquiry is favorable to him, the prisoner is recommended to the Governor for release into the care of a parole officer to whom, at stated intervals, he is required to report. And it is the function of the officer to help in every way possible to keep him in suitable employment, out of contact with demoralizing situations during the parole period, that extends usually over

____________________
1
For a sketch of the history of parole, see Edward Lindsey: "Historical Sketch of the Indeterminate Sentence and Parole System." Jour. Crim. Law and Criminol., XVI, I, May, 1925, 9.

-329-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Criminology
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 468

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.