The Early Poems and the Fiction

By Walt Whitman; Thomas L. Brasher | Go to book overview

WALT WHITMAN


The Early Poems and the Fiction

Edited by Thomas L. Brasher

NEW YORK UNIVERSITY PRESS 1963

-iii-

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The Early Poems and the Fiction
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • Introduction xv
  • A Note on the Text xix
  • Walt Whitman The Early Poems and the Fiction The Poems 1
  • Old Grimes 5
  • The Inca's Daughter 6
  • The Love That is Hereafter 8
  • The Spanish Lady 10
  • The Columbian's Song 12
  • The Winding-Up 14
  • Each Has His Grief 16
  • The Punishment of Pride 18
  • Ambition 21
  • Fame's Vanity 23
  • The Death and Burial of Mcdonald Clarke A Parody 25
  • Time to Come 27
  • Death of the Nature-Lover 30
  • The Play-Ground 33
  • Ode 34
  • The House of Friends 36
  • Resurgemus 38
  • Sailing the Mississippi at Midnight 42
  • Dough-Face Song 44
  • Blood-Money 47
  • New Year's Day, 1848 49
  • Isle of La Belle Riviere 50
  • Walt Whitman The Early Poems and the Fiction The Fiction 53
  • Wild Frank's Return 61
  • The Child and the Profligate 68
  • Bervance: Or, Father and Son 80
  • The Tomb Blossoms 88
  • The Last of the Sacred Army 95
  • The Last Loyalist 101
  • Reuben's Last Wish 110
  • A Legend of Life and Love 115
  • The Angel of Tears 120
  • Franklin Evans Or The Inebriate A Tale of the Times 124
  • Chapter X 177
  • The Madman 240
  • The Love of Eris: A Spirit Record 244
  • My Boys and Girls 248
  • Dumb Kate 251
  • The Little Sleighers 254
  • The Half-Breed: A Tale of the Western Frontier 257
  • Chapter V 274
  • Chapter VI 277
  • Chapter VII 280
  • Shirval: A Tale of Jerusalem 292
  • Richard Parker's Widow 296
  • The Boy Lover 302
  • One Wicked Impulse! 309
  • Some Fact-Romances 319
  • The Shadow and the Light of a Young Man's Soul 327
  • Lingave's Temptation 331
  • Appendix A- Publication History of Whitman's Fiction 335
  • Appendix B- Chronology Of Walt Whitman's Life and Work 341
  • Index 345
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