The Genesis of Russophobia in Great Britain: A Study of the Interaction of Policy and Opinion

By John Howes Gleason | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VI
THE CRISIS OF 1833

THE AGGRAVATING INFLUENCE exerted by the events of the Polish revolution upon English judgments of Russia and her policy was immediately apparent during the Near Eastern crisis of 1833. If the startling success of the Egyptian armies in 1832, the consequent advance of Russian military and naval forces to the Bosporus, and the conclusion of a Russo-Turkish alliance at Unkiar Skelessi constituted a major transformation in Near Eastern affairs,1the contemporaneous discussion of those events shows that there was very little immediate appreciation of their significance. Their nature and location afford at least a partial explanation of the scant attention paid to them in the press. The efforts of the Porte to secure the assistance of its allies were necessarily secret, only unsubstantiated rumors being available to journalists, and the military events in Syria and Asia Minor were even more remote from the ordinary channels of news than had been those of the Russo-Turkish war. Thus although the arrival of a Russian expeditionary force could not remain secret, its presence on the Bosporus was still doubted in London in late April.2The complacent character of the editorial commentaries upon the occasional reports which did arrive in London and the tendency of the articles to conclude with a tangential harangue on the ills of Poland must reflect a general failure to appreciate the full significance of what was taking place.

The treatment accorded the subject by the Times serves to illustrate that of the press as a whole, and, particularly in view of their smaller size and circulation, only the deviations of the other papers require notice. Although the Russian proffer of aid to Turkey had been known in London officially in December

____________________
1
Temperley, Near East, pp. 63-74.
2
Times, 30 April 1833.

-135-

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The Genesis of Russophobia in Great Britain: A Study of the Interaction of Policy and Opinion
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents *
  • Chapter I - Policy and Opinion -- Russophobia 1
  • Chapter II - England and Russia Prior to 1815 9
  • Chapter III - The Aftermath of Vienna 16
  • Chapter IV - The Greek Revolution 57
  • Chapter V - The Polish Revolution 107
  • Chapter VI - The Crisis of 1833 135
  • Chapter VII - David Urquhart -- the Vixen 164
  • Chapter VIII - The Navy -- Afghanistan 205
  • Chapter IX - The Near Eastern Crisis, 1839-1841 226
  • Chapter X - Russophobia 272
  • Bibliography 291
  • Index 307
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