The Legends of Troy in Art and Literature

By Margaret R. Scherer | Go to book overview

NOTES

INTRODUCTION

The following works are invaluable for any consideration of the scope and persistence of the Troy legend in literature and art:

For the Greek and Roman worlds: Real-Encyklopädie der klassischen Altertumswissenschaft, ed. by Pauly, Wissowa, Kroll, and others, Stuttgart, 1894- 1957; The Oxford Classical Dictionary, Oxford, 1949; Moses Hadas, Ancilla to Classical Reading, for general background; Sir James Frazer notes to the Loeb Classical Library edition of Apollodorus' Library, London, 1922, 2 vols., for comparative versions of various themes; Tenney Frank, Life and Literature in the Roman Republic, University of California Press, 1930; John Wight Duff, A Literary History of Rome from the Origins to the Close of the Golden Age, New York, 1960, and A Literary History of Rome in the Silver Age, New York, 1960; J. W. Mackail, Latin Literature, New York, 1895, 1923.

A most useful list of heroic subjects on Greek vases is Frank Brommer Vasenlisten zur Griechischen Heldensage, Marburg/Lahn, 1960.

For the classical influence in the Middle Ages and Renaissance: R. R. Bolgar, The Classical Heritage and Its Beneficiaries, Cambridge ( Eng.), 1954, which carries the theme through the Renaissance and in its Appendices gives invaluable lists of Greek MSS. in Italy during the fifteenth century and of the translations of Greek and Roman classics before 1600; Ernst R. Curtius, European Literature and the Latin Middle Ages, trans. by W. R. Trask, New York [ 1953], Bollingen Series XXXVI; H. O. Taylor, The Classical Heritage of the Middle Ages, 3rd ed., New York, 1911; Wilhelm Greif, Die mittelalterlichen Bearbeitungen der Trojanersage: ein neuer Beitrag zur Dares- und Dictysfrage, Marburg, 1885.

For surveys of the influence of Greek and Latin literature upon later periods: J. E. Sandys, A History of Classical Scholarship, Cambridge ( Eng.), 3 vols., 1908- 1921, Vol. I, Seventh Century B.C. to the End of the Middle Ages, Vol. II, From the Revival of Learning to the End of the Eighteenth Century (except Germany), Vol. III, The Eighteenth Century in Germany and the Nineteenth Century in Europe and the United States of America; Gilbert Highet, The Classical Tradition, New York, 1949, which outlines this tradition almost to the date of publication and, with copious notes, forms the most comprehensive modern survey in the field; A Bibliography of the Survival of the Classics, 2 vols., London, 1934, 1938 (German text), which covers a wide range of books and articles on the subject.

For the persistence of classical motives in art: Erwin Panofsky and Fritz Saxl, Classical Mythology in Medieval Art, Metropolitan Museum Studies, Vol. IV, New York, 1933, pp.228-280; Erwin Panofsky, Meaning in the Visual Arts, New York, 1955, chapter on Iconography and Iconology: an Introduction to the Study of Renaissance Art; Jean Seznec, The Survival of the Pagan Gods, trans. by Barbara F. Sessions,

-255-

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The Legends of Troy in Art and Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Before the Iliad 1
  • The Iliad 55
  • The Fall of Troy 95
  • The Oresteia 131
  • The Odyssey 141
  • The Aeneid 181
  • Appendices - A Partial List of Works of Literature and Music And A Selection of Works of Art 217
  • Notes 255
  • List of Plates 279
  • Index of Mythological Personages And Places 287
  • General Index 295
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