Oratorical Culture in Nineteenth-Century America: Transformations in the Theory and Practice of Rhetoric

By Gregory Clark; S. Michael Halloran | Go to book overview

5
The Popularization of
Nineteenth-Century
Rhetoric

Elocution and the Private Learner

Nan Johnson

The nineteenth-century academic tradition in rhetoric fostered the view that eloquence in speaking and writing was the mark of the well- educated and thoughtful citizen. Prominent nineteenth-century rhetoricians such as Samuel P. Newman, G. P. Quackenbos, and John Franklin Genung, whose treatises were widely circulated in nineteenth-century colleges and universities, defined rhetoric as the art that contributed the most toward the proper workings of the political process, the disposition of justice, and the maintenance of the public welfare and social conscience. Nineteenth-century rhetoricians equated the moral obligations of the rhetorician with the preservation of democratic culture and promoted the assumption that training in oratory and composition increased a citizen's ability to participate in civil life and thus contribute to the intellectual and spiritual health of a progressive nation. Although the nineteenth-century rhetorical tradition placed the most ideological stress on rhetoric as a form of training for civil life and as a central means of cultivating intellectual and moral taste, academic rhetoricians also promoted the practical uses of rhetoric and increasingly acknowledged the relationship between the study of rhetoric and professionalism as the century advanced.

In the first half of the century, academic training in rhetoric focused on instruction that would benefit young men training in law, the ministry, or politics, all professions in which public speaking was a central and necessary skill. By mid-century, college doors were

-139-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Oratorical Culture in Nineteenth-Century America: Transformations in the Theory and Practice of Rhetoric
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 284

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.